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  IDEA ANNUAL FUNDRAISING DRIVE

Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia's Speech Engagement Schedule


 

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. is proud to announce the launching of Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia's  new book. For contents of the book, please click on the following link: www.africanidea.org/Ghelawdewos_Araia_New_Book.html and individual subscribers (including students) interested in purchasing the book should send a check of $25 ($20 + $5 for shipping and handling) payable to Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia's  to 1199 Whitney Ave Suite 523 Hamden, Ct, 06517; institutions including libraries should send $35 ($30 + $5 for shipping and handling). For further information, email webmaster@africanidea.org or call (203) 789-1990 (203) 747-2763 (203) 537-0240

 


Purchase one book & get the second one for Free
October 3, 2011

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. once again is launching Cultures That We Must Preserve and Reject (Tigrigna and Amharic), authored by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia. Subscribers interested in buying the book must indicate their selection (Amharic or Tigrigna) and if they decide to purchase the book, they will get Advice to the Son & In Memory to the Father by Belaten Geta Herouy Wolde Selassie for free.
Subscribers must send a check in the amount of $18.00 (this includes shipping and handling), payable to Ghelawdewos Araia, to 1199 Whitney Avenue Suite 523, Hamden, CT 06517  For further information, please call (203) 789-1990 or email    
webmaster@africanidea.org   


IDEA Rare and Special Collection Books for Sale
Books on Ethiopia, African Studies, African-American Studies, Political Science, Political Economy, International Studies, History, and Literature are available for purchase. Note: Book prices plus shipping and handling are final, and once books are purchased they cannot be returned for refund.

How to Order: Select your title and make check payable to IDEA, Inc. and add $4 for shipping and handling cost (and add $2 for additional copy, i.e. if you order 2 books, mailing cost would be $6; if 3 copies, $8 etc) and mail your check to 975 Mix Ave, Suite 3K, Hamden, Ct 06514. The price for each book is noted against the corresponding title of respective books. For questions: 

email webmaster@africanidea.org



Current Issues in Educational Development in Selected African Countries: A Comparative and International Education Perspective 
Ghelawdewos Araia October 13, 2014
This article intends to critically examine the state of educational developments in Botswana and South Africa from Southern Africa; Ethiopia and Tanzania from East Africa; Ghana, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone from West Africa; and Egypt and Morocco from North Africa. The methodology employed throughout the text of this article is the comparative and international education perspective, but the latter, as some people assume, is not simply about comparisons and contrasts. It goes deeper rather in exploring the educational theory and practice in international context, delves into the purposes of schooling, educational access and opportunities, accountability, as well as professionalism and quality education. The methodology also involves demographic attributes, geographical and economic realities, as well as political and cultural factors. 




Obama Praises Development in Ethiopia
Sep 28th, 2014


US-ETHIOPIA-OBAMA-DESALEGN PRESIDENT OBAMA: Well, I want to extend a warm welcome to Prime Minister Desalegn and his delegation. When I spoke previously at the Africa Summit about some of the bright spots and progress that we’re seeing in Africa, I think there’s no better example than what has been happening in Ethiopia — one of the fastest-growing economies in the world. We have seen enormous progress in a country that once had great difficulty feeding itself. It’s now not only leading the pack in terms of agricultural production in the region, but will soon be an exporter potentially not just of agriculture, but also power because of the development that’s been taking place there.


The ISIS Factor: What Islamic Jihad Means for Ethiopia and the Rest of Africa
IDEA Viewpoint

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD September 20, 2014

ISIS is the latest mystique obscurity of the Islamic Jihad variety, but Jihad is not novice to Ethiopia and/or the rest of Africa. The acronym ISIS actually should read ISIL meaning Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (the geographic area that includes Iraq, Jordan, Israel, Syria, and parts of Turkey). The geopolitics of ISIS, though conceptual rather than actual, includes the entire Middle East, all Horn of Africa countries, all North African countries, some African countries, Spain, and countries like Indonesia in South East Asia. 
The new ISIL Jihad extremists who gained momentum in destabilized Syria and Iraq have preferred to use the name ISIS, perhaps inadvertently or by design, in order to have a catchy name that corresponds to the ancient Egyptian goddess, Isis (Aset).


Fingerprint Geometric Analysis
Andres J. Washington

 

Dear Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia


Kahsay Abraha the author of Yeasimba Fikir interview with VOA 

 

 

Date: Monday, September 8, 2014, 7:28 PM GREEN PEACE TAKES AIM AT SOUTH 
AFRICA’S ‘ESKOM’ OVER AIR-BORNE KILLER COAL DUST Sep. 8 (GIN)
– 

Environmental activists at Green peace Africa have launched a global  campaign to block efforts by Eskom, South Africa’s public power utility, to release more polluting coal dust in the air. The dust has been linked to an uptick in premature deaths now estimated at 2,700 every year. Green peace is pushing its campaign in the wake of an application by Eskom to postpone compliance with new minimum emissions  standards aimed at reducing the damaging health impacts of air pollution. The new standards will impact the north-eastern Mpumalanga Province where 12 coal-fired power plants are clustered on the western  high-altitude


FIGHT OVER SPOILS TURNS DEADLY IN LEADERLESS LESOTHO By Global Infor...

September 03,2014 
In the Mountain Kingdom of Lesotho, encircled by South Africa, there’s trouble in paradise. 

Prime Minister Tom Thabane, fearing a military coup, slipped out of the country Saturday night,

 to reappear in Johannesburg calling for intervention by that country’s security forces. Thabane believed 

he was a target by his coalition partner seeking his ouster so he blocked a no-confidence vote in 

parliament and suspended the entire body in June. Lesotho has endured numerous military coups 

since gaining independence from Britain in 1966. In the current skirmish, Thabane, 75, commands 

the loyalty of the police. The deputy prime minister, Mothetjoa Metsing, has the support of the army. - 


LIBERIA CONTENDS WITH EBOLA AS DIASPORANS URGE ‘REGIME CHANGE’

 Sep. 2 (GIN) – Photos of Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf looking tired or grim suggest the toll the current Ebola epidemic has taken on  the 75 year old leader. The crisis, for which the region was  ill-prepared, has taken over a thousand lives – some 700 in Liberia - and many of the improvised control strategies appear to have backfired including the quarantining of the overcrowded West Point slum. This week, nurses at Liberia's largest hospital walked off their jobs, demanding better pay and equipment to protect them against the deadly epidemic. "From the beginning of the Ebola outbreak we have not had any protective equipment


TO BE NAMED FOR SIERRA LEONEAN MD WHO TREATED VICTIMS OF EBOLA
Sep. 2 (GIN) -
 

The family of Sheik Humarr Khan has set up a foundation in his name to help pay for the education of future medical workers and provide support to the families of doctors and nurses who lose their lives in the field, The Lancet, a medical magazine reported in a recent issue. “He was very aware of the dangers of his work, but selflessly worked around the clock to ensure that patients received the best possible standard of care”, said Kristian Andersen, a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard University.
“He saved the lives of many patients.” Khan, virologist and expert in viral hemorrhagic fevers who led Sierra Leone's Ebola response, died from Ebola in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, on July 29. He was 39.He was born in Lungi, Sierra Leone, on March 6, 1975. Humarr Khan’s brother Alhajie recalled how one day, before school exams, Sheik read the obituary of a German doctor who had come to Sierra Leone to help treat people with Lassa fever. He had contracted the disease and died. Sheik, then 15 years old,



The Art of the Kaizen Approach for Sugar Production in Ethiopia: 
Lessons from the Methara Sugar Factory 

Asayehgn Desta, Ph.D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California


Business Process Reengineering (BPR) deals with fundamental organizational change, or is the great-leap approach to redesigning and retooling. It seeks to bring a radical approach to creating a breakthrough in organizations trapped in outmoded and outdated business processes. Top managers and consultants design new ways of doing things and force companies to go beyond continuous improvement of existing products, services, and processes. Though innovative, BPR is being challenged by some companies looking for a strategic remedy that will contribute to the sustainable improvement of their performance and quality, add value for their customers while minimizing cost and eliminating waste. 


Africa News in Brief from Global Information Network
Tuesday, July 29, 2014, 10:09 AM FRENCH FIRM LOSES BID TO OWN 

AFRICA’S ‘ROOIBOS’ TRADEMARK Jul 28 (GIN) –
South African tea planters won a major victory over European and U.S. Tea dealers this week. They defeated efforts by a French firm to gain control of the name “Rooibos” - a popular tea that grows in South Africa - by trademarking it abroad. Under the agreement, Rooibos, which means ‘red bush’ in Afrikaans, will refer to tea grown in the  Cederberg mountains in the Western Cape where it’s been farmed for generations. The indigenous shrub-like plant is known for its health benefits, sweet taste and many uses. These include herbal teas, fruit juices and other foodstuffs, as well as healthy and beauty products. 



SURVIVORS OF ‘BIAFRA WAR’ IN NEW PUSH FOR REPARATIONS
Jul. 14 (GIN) – Survivors of the Nigerian civil war that raged for 3 years and whose horror was captured in 

unforgettable photographic images that shocked the world have renewed their demand for compensation for 

the suffering of those years.
Ndigbos, a socio-cultural Igbo group, were cut down in a brutal war that followed years 
of political wrangling among three regional-political sectors joined in an uneasy alliance by British colonialists. The newly-independent Nigeria consisted of Yoruba, Igbo and Muslim Hausas. After a deadly coup and counter-coup, the Igbos declared their intention to breakaway and form a sovereign republic called Biafra. Their intention triggered a war against the new republic which had minimal defenses. A military blockade of the Biafrans in 1968 led to a humanitarian disaster including widespread civilian hunger and starvation in the besieged Igbo areas. The Biafrans claimed that Nigeria used hunger and genocide to win the war, and they sought aid from the outside world. Only five countries (Tanzania, Gabon, Côte d'Ivoire, Zambia and Haiti) officially recognized the endangered Biafra republic. 



CHILD MARRIAGE – NIGERIA’S OTHER SCOURGE
Jun. 30 (GIN) – Nearly 300 school-age girls are still in the hands of Boko Haram, a Nigerian terrorist group, but they’re not the only group of young women yanked from school against their will and made to work at the beck and call of husbands they did not choose. A new exposé rips Nigeria for its record number of child brides – some as young as 9.
According to the U.N. Population Fund, Nigeria has one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world.


May 31, 2014

Book Launching and Discussion on Contemporary Ethiopia

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) is proud to announce the launching of Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia’s book, Ethiopia: Democracy, Devolution of Power, and The Developmental State in Washington DC on June 28, 2014.

IDEA encourages all Ethiopians and scholars on Ethiopia in the Washington DC Metro Area to join the fascinating discussion on contemporary Ethiopia. Professor Haile Gerima will introduce the book signing ceremony and Dr. Araia will engage the audience in a lively and interactive intellectual discussion.

Venue: Sanfoka Video and Books, 2714 Georgia Ave, Washington DC 20001

Time: Saturday June 28 at 3 pm


‘INVEST IN OUR GIRLS,’ SAYS LIBERIA’S ‘MA ELLEN,’ IF AFRICA IS TO RISE
Jun. 16 (GIN) – In an open letter dated June 16 – the International Day of the African Child – Liberian President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf warned there would be no “Africa Rising” without a serious “investment in our girls.”
The key cornerstone to addressing some of the world's most pressing challenges is through providing a quality education to all children, especially girls, the former World Bank official known as “Ma Ellen” declared.
“To not invest in and prioritize girls' education, we as African leaders are telling our women that we do not care,” she said. “As one of those women, I will not accept this and I urge all our leaders to invest in our children's future. Investing in girls' education is not only a moral imperative, it is a smart investment.”
The Liberian leader noted that Africa had the dubious distinction of having the highest rate of girls not in school and in sub-Saharan Africa nearly four out of five poor rural girls are not completing primary school.


HASHTAG’ CAMPAIGN FOR KIDNAPPED GIRLS SPARKS DISPUTE
J
un. 9 (GIN) – Is the social media campaign to bring back the abducted Nigerian schoolgirls an effective tool to win their freedom or just trending until the next big thing comes along? That’s the question heating up the news wires with rescue efforts at an apparent standstill and new dramas coming on the media stage.
Staff writer Joshua Keating in Slate.com was among the questioners. He compared #BringBackOurGirls to the #StopKony campaign of 2012. “Stop Kony was the most successful viral video in history and succeeded in making Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army internationally famous,” he wrote.
But the video had flaws. “It not only fudged basic facts of geography and chronology, but failed to provide viewers with any social, political or economic context for Kony’s violence,” Keating said.


NEW PRESIDENT OF MALAWI TAKES POWER UNDER FELONY CLOUD

June 2 (GIN) – In his second try for elected office, Peter Mutharika captured the winning margin of victory and edged out Malawi’s first woman president – Joyce Banda.

The 74 year old Mutharika, brother of a former president, was declared the victor last week in a disputed election. But he comes into office under a cloud, accused of attempting a constitutional coup two years ago by hiding the death of his brother, President Bingu wa Mutharika, in order to block Mrs. Banda – then vice-president – from assuming the presidency.
When President Bingu wa Mutharika suffered a cardiac arrest on April 5, 2012, brother Peter allegedly pushed forward a measure allowing him to become President, overriding the constitution. A secret meeting to swear him in failed and Mrs. Banda was elevated to the top job.



The Passing of an African American Giant in Literary and Political Movements: Maya Angelou 1928-2014

May 28, 2014

  The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) extends its condolence to the immediate and extended families of Maya Angelou and celebrates her life as jack-of-all-trades and quintessential poet laureate.  Maya Angelou became famous with her first book entitled I know Why the Caged Bird Sings; she directed Down in the Delta, a film that made her famous, and the whole world also witnessed when she came to read a poem for the presidential election of Bill Clinton in 1993.

 

Melvin Donalson in his book CORNERSTONES: An Anthology of African American Literature tells us how Maya sees herself in her own words: “for the black voice and any ear which can hear it. As a composer writes for musical instruments and a choreographer creates for the body, I search for sound, tempos, and rhythms to ride through the vocal cord over the tongue and out the lips of Black people…I write because I am a black woman, listening attentively to her talking people.”  


May 20, 2013
In light of Egypt's leader, Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi plan to visit Ethiopia, the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) recommends Ethiopian policy makers to make reflections on an editorial entitled Egypt has no choice but to cooperate with Ethiopia, published on June 12, 2013. IDEA also encourages its subscribers to re-read the said editorial and come up with constructive ideas in an effort to support the Ethiopian people's initiative to construct and complete the Grand Renaissance Dam. The editorial, written almost a year ago, can be accessed by the following link: www.africanidea.org/Egypt_has_no_choice.html 


ATTENTION UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES, INSTITUTIONS, and Bibliophiles 
Seize the moment for a highly acclaimed book entitled ETHIOPIA: Democracy, Devolution of Power, and The Developmental State
Author: Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia

ISBN: 978-0-578-12124-6
Paperback
Publisher and distributor: Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA)
Price: $30 plus $5 for shipping and handling
For book order, please visit www.africanidea.org and for contacting the publisher you may email via webmaster@africanidea.org or call (203) 747-2763, (203) 789-1990, and (203) 537-0240. Libraries and other institutions should send their order number, mail address, email, and phone number in order to expedite delivery. The book has been reviewed in many blogs and websites, including Amazon and the author has enjoyed several book launch and reception events at higher institutions of learning including Teachers College, Columbia University.
Please see attachment for book image 


Creating Territorial Boundaries to Design the Political Order of 
Self- rule and Shared-rule of Federal Units: A Review 

Desta, Aayehgn, Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Barowsky School of Business, Dominican University of California 
Federation involves a territorial division of power between constituent units – sometimes called provinces, cantons, possibly cities and states, and the central government (Watts, 1998).  In other words, federalism may be defined as a form of governmental and institutional structure designed by the will of the stakeholders to maintain unity while also preserving diversity (Odion, 2011). The main characteristics of federalism include: 1) political power that is structurally dispersed among centers of authority to encourage both self and shared rule; 2) subordinate units prescribed by areas of jurisdiction that cannot be invaded by the central authority; 3) leaders of subordinate units who draw their power heavily from local sources independent of the central authority; 4) governmental institutions of the sub-units that have democratic rights to choose their own officials and develop (by forming their own constitution, symbols, anthems, etc) their own policies within their areas of jurisdiction; 5) leaders and representatives of each sub-unit who possess a legally protected base from which they can voice their opposition to the central authority; and 6) governors of each unit chosen not by the ruling political party but are elected by  local residents ( Feeley,1994). 


Yohannes IV of Ethiopia: A Political Biography

            Revised Edition, The Red Sea Press 2014

Authored by Zewde Gabre-Sellassie, PhD

Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

 May 6, 2014  

Zewde Gabre-Sellassie’s book pioneered in fully exploring and documenting the political biography of Emperor Yohannes in detail and in depth. Other books on Yohannes include that of Bairu Tafla’s Chronicle of Yohannes IV: 1872-1889; Tekle Tsadiq Mekuria’s Atse Yohannes ‘na Ya Ethiopia Andinet (Emperor Yohannes and the Unity of Ethiopia); and Mamo Wudneh’s Yohannes (fiction in Amharic), not to mention numerous articles including mine entitled The Martyred King of Kings: Emperor Yohannes IV that I wrote in 2006 (www.africanidea.org/atse_yohannes.pdf) .The Red Sea Press posthumously published Yohannes IV of Ethiopia: A Political Biography, first put out by the Clarendon Press in 1975, now revised and updated by the author. The book is organized into thirteen chapters and supplemented by nine appendices that greatly enriched the respective chapters and more specifically the historical themes of the text, and this becomes handy for the casual reader as well as the scholar engaged in serious research.




Nigeria holds up release of highly acclaimed film by popular novelist
Apr. 28 (GIN) – A new film based on the highly-praised novel by Nigerian author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichi has run into “regulatory issues” from Nigerian censors who have delayed its release

South African who fought toxic waste dumping wins environmental prize
By Alessandra Scipione
 
Apr. 28 (GIN) - A South African environmentalist Desmond D’sa has been awarded the 2014 Goldman Environmental Prize. Desmond D'Sa, a community leader and co-founder of the South Durban Community Environmental Alliance in 1996, campaigned against toxic waste dumping in South Durban, a poor but highly industrialized area, finally successfully obtaining the closure of the chemical dump.
SOMALI MOTHER OF STOWAWAY TEEN WEEPS TO LEARN OF HIS RISKY FLIGHT
Apr. 18 (GIN) – The mother of the 14 year old boy who risked death to stow away in the wheel well of a plane bound for Hawaii wept upon learning of his life-threatening adventure. Ubah Mohamed Abdullahi, who lives in a refugee camp in Ethiopia, says it was the first news she had heard about her lost son for six years.

South Africa Celebrates 20 Years Of Democracy 
Bill Chappell

People attend South Africa's Freedom Day celebrations in Pretoria, with the federal Union Building in the background Sunday. The day marks the end of the apartheid era, when all races went to the polls to vote in historic 1994 elections. President Jacob Zuma led Freedom Day celebrations in Pretoria Sunday, as South Africa marked the 20th anniversary of democratic rule. The nation held its first general elections in 1994, when voters sent Nelson Mandela to the presidency with a resounding win that helped the country distance itself from the scourge of apartheid.


Uniting A Continent:
A Celebration of the Organization of African Unity

Dr. Gelawdewos,

As our community of supporters have propelled Tsehai for the past decade, we look to nourish and expand even further. Today we launch a month-long Indiegogo campaign to support the publication of our newest project, Uniting a Continent. Indiegogo is an online crowd-funding website that allows projects to be funded through a word-of-mouth approach, which incorporates the individual donor as essential to the project's completion. Uniting a Continent is a beautifully designed and informative book that chronicles the formation of the Organization of African Unity (OAU), and exemplifies the rich cultural heritage of each African nation. We believe this book will contribute to the telling of a story that needs to be told, one that will continue to be told by future generations.


Alliance and Alienation 

Ethiopia and Israel in the Days of Haile Selassie 

Authored by Haggai Erlich, PhD The Red Sea Press, 2014

Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD April 17, 2014

Haggai Erlich is a renowned Israeli historian and an Ethiopianist, and this is not the first time he is writing about Ethiopia. One of his excellent books on Ethiopia put out by the Lynne Rienner Publishers in 1986 is Ethiopia and the Challenge of Independence. What makes Alliance and Alienation different is the fact that the book is heavily focused on diplomacy and intelligence with respect to the Ethiopian-Israeli relations. The book also provides the reader some secretly conducted diplomatic ventures and investments of the Israeli Government as well as the unofficial sojourn of Israeli leaders in Ethiopia.

Alliance and Alienation
Ethiopia and Israel in the Days of Haile Selassie PDF format


The Misdirection of Healthcare Facilities:
Don’t You Need to Wake up Before it's Too Late? 
Professor Desta, Asayehgn 

While the fundamentals of human rights place health services as indispensable for the exercise of other human rights conducive to living a life of dignity, the human capital theory locates health as fundamental to enhancing the efficiency and productivity of the labor force. Given these as fundamental rights of health services, it is disheartening to note that a number of policy makers in a number of developing countries don’t seem to have a sustained political will to allocate their limited heath sector budget to providing accessible health care facilities for their citizens.
 


HOPES OF QUICK AND EASY VICTORY FADE FOR EMBATTLED ANC

Apr. 14 (GIN) – As the May 7 election day in South Africa nears, former friends and allies of the ruling African National Congress are betting that voters will follow them out of the party or at least send a strong message that the country’s current direction is not good enough.

 A number of veterans of the anti-apartheid struggle and former government leaders have even launched a “Vote NO!” campaign that could dash ANC hopes for a quick and easy win.

 Among the veterans is former intelligence minister Ronnie Kasrils, former deputy health minister Nozizwe Madlala-Routledge and other ANC stalwarts.


The Ground Water Potential of the North African Region and the Nile Issue

Asmamaw Temesgen was a native of Lake Tana Region, source of the Abay River, April 7, 2014.
This article was designed to provide a brief overview on the Geo-scientific information and the economic potential of the enormous natural water reserves in the North African Region. Focus was made to the growing water resource demands of the region, particularly on the “Nile River Saga”. The writer has a Geo-scientific back ground and aims to draw more attention to some of the relevant information about the ground water potential of the region that has not been covered from the Egyptian’s standpoint. He also tries to connect the information gap and aspects that has to be dealt with, when dealing the Nile Issue. Furthermore, it is to allow the readers to understand the importance of a massive water potential in the North African Region.


BLUE NILE MONOLOGUE 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD April 3, 2014

I was born millions of years ago

Perhaps 180 million years geological timeline
When Gondwanaland broke up
During the Mesozoic period
When crustal extension took place
Beyond the Lake ŢanaNear the mountain called Denquez


On behalf of the Institute of Development and Education for  

Africa (IDEA), Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia will soon begin reviewing

several books on Ethiopia and two of the books whose 

image is shown here, 'Alliance and Alienation' by Haggai Erlich and

'Yohannes IV of Ethiopia' (revised edition) by Zewde Gebre-Selassie

will be the first to be reviewed. Readers interested in purchasing the books can directly contact the the publisher at the address below:

The Red Sea Pres, Inc.

541 W. Ingham Ave. Suite B   Trenton, Nj 08638  

                                             (609) 695-3200

awprsp@verizon.net    http://www.africaworldpressbooks.com/


The Battle of Adwa, African Victory in the Age of Empire: A Reflection 

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D, Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California 

Introduction
The defeat of Italy by Ethiopia on March 1, 1896 at the Battle of Adwa, then the vibrant capital of Tigrai, not only demonstrated the resilience and patriotism of Ethiopians but also made Ethiopia the steward of future hopes for the emancipation of the other nations that were subjugated under foreign rule. For example, Japan, used Ethiopia’s experience as its model and developed a strategy to fight against Russia in 1904. However, for a number of the European colonialists, when they heard that Italy was defeated by the heroic Ethiopian army at the Battle of Adwa in 1896, they were surprised and humiliated that members of the white race had lost. They suddenly had to rethink their ideas and policies about Africa being predominantly inhabited by primitive people that needed colonial rule in order to advance into a modern world. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY
Vice President’s Office for Diversity and Community Affairs, Office of Alumni Affairs, African Alumni Club of Columbia University

A BOOK LAUNCH AND RECEPTION FOR GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA PH.D
A BOOK LAUNCH AND RECEPTION FOR
DR. GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA


Two more colossal pharaoh statues unveiled in Egypt 
March 25, 2014
By Jay Deshmukh, Riad Abou Awad 

The Daily Star 
Archaeologists unveiled two colossal statues of Pharaoh Amenhotep III in Egypt's famed temple city of Luxor Sunday, adding to an existing pair of world-renowned tourist attractions. The temple is already famous for its existing 3,400-year-old Memnon colossi – twin statues of Amenhotep III, whose reign archaeologists say marked the political and cultural zenith of ancient Egyptian civilization


March 5, 2014

The Ethiopian Community Development Council (ECDC) is seeking help from the Ethiopian Diaspora and other donors

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. would like to encourage its subscribers to extend financial contributions to ECDC’s Axumite Heritage Foundation (AHF) library project at Aksum, Ethiopia. The construction of the library had begun in 2010 but AHF was unable to complete its project due to financial constraints. IDEA has deep appreciation to ECDC and AHF’s initiatives and strongly believes that this great purpose needs the support of all of us. 


Folder Header: Nepotism and misappropriation as management practices within the African Peer Review Mechanism 
By Ramata Sore ramata.sore@gmail.com
Since its inception, the credibility of the APRM was based on a Panel of independent persons. This Panel led the assessments of the countries that are members of the institution. And these assessments were free from political pressures and manipulations. And in the course of its actions, the Panel was supported by a technically competent and motivated Secretariat. Thus, the assessment reports on governance have enabled many African citizens to participate in political debates in their respective countries, as said the Senegalese Marie-Angelique Savane, one of the former leaders of this structure.


The Ethiopia Eritrea No War No Peace Situation has to End

 The Horn of Africa is the most conflict ridden region in the world. The people and the land are devastated by endless wars. The de facto no war no peace policy that has persisted between Ethiopia and Eritrea for the last 13 years affects the lives of millions in both countries and the stability of the whole region. Bringing this conflict to a peaceful resolution is of paramount importance.

The devastating 1998 - 2000 war between Ethiopia and Eritrea cost billions of dollars in infrastructure damage, missed investment opportunities and lost aid, claimed about 100,000 lives, and dislocated millions  of people. Instead of the end of the war bringing peace, for the last fourteen years the policy of both countries has been “no war no peace.”  As bad as open war is, an endless no war no peace situation is insufferable. 


Overcoming Water Scarcity Problem in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

March 12, 2014 መጋቢት 3 2006

In anticipation of World Water Day, which will be observed on March 22, the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) presents ideas and strategies to overcome the problem of water scarcity and water public works in Ethiopia. It may sound paradoxical for Ethiopians (the people of the Blue Nile) to go thirsty when their country, in fact, is the source of all waters that replenish the gift of life for the neighboring peoples. But, that is the stark reality now. Therefore, this Amharic article proposes several methods to solve water shortage problems in Ethiopian communities and IDEA hopes they will be implemented and effectively reverse the current problem that has afflicted many districts in the country.


February 10, 2014
What happened to the African Renaissance?
Postliberation Eritrea

Special issue of the journal Africa Today, Volume 60.2
Guest editor: Tekle M. Woldemikael AFT-60_2-Cover-1
Twenty years ago, Eritrea conducted a successful referendum, gaining independent state status. It received recognition as a new African Renaissance state, and was on the forefront of African renewal and rebirth, which included the nations of South Africa, Namibia, Uganda, and Ethiopia as well. This occurred after many gloomy years of pessimism about progress, 


Ethiopia: The Monastery At Debre Damo - History the Origin of Ethiopian Self-Confidence
By Richard Dowden, 25 February 2014

allAfrica Analysis

No wonder the monastery at Debre Damo has survived unmolested for some 900 years among the vast Tigrayan Mountains of Northern Ethiopia. Getting to it is arduous - the last stretch is achieved via an 80 foot rope. A few feet from the top my arms gave out and I couldn't move. I dangled desperately searching for a foothold. There wasn't one. The drop was dizzying. After what seemed like an hour, I felt the second rope, made of strips of cowhide stitched together, take my weight and I was ignominiously pulled up to the ledge. The strong young monk who had hauled me up took my trembling hand and greeted me formally.


Wretched of the Earth Ethiopian Genius  

February 26, 2014

The Ancient Egyptian Kemetic creation theory and the Big Bang creation theory of the universe have something in common: Void. Out of nothing (empty space) came out something. This Ethiopian genius, whose name is Ishak Ayiris also came out from an impoverished Ethiopian parents, who had nothing and who were in fact wretched of the earth, to borrow Fanon’s book title. Ishak has now a bright future and the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), with pleasure, brings the story of Ishak Ayiris to the attention of its readers. Please read!

 http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/eton-college-council-estate-kid-3185903 


Critique on and Supplement to Bank Sector Reform in Ethiopia
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD February 24, 2014

This essay, as its title suggests, intends to critique and supplement Bank Sector Reform in Ethiopia by Drs. Desta Asayehgn and Admassu Bezabeh that was published by (IDEA) Inc. (www.africanidea.org/Banking_sector_in_Ethiopia.html). I found their abstract interesting, especially in some parts where the authors present sound arguments and are leveled against government policies as constructive criticism, and I will endorse the ideas that I agree with. On some of their ideas, however, I have different views, reservations and disagreements; hence I will critique those ideas in an effort to make input and insight for future considerations. 



Banking Sector Reform in Ethiopia: An Abstract

Admassu Bezabeh, Ph.D,  School of Business and Leadership,  Dominican University of California San Rafael, California 

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D. School of Business and Leadership , Dominican University of California, San Rafael, California.

The fragile and inefficient state-dominated banking sector that existed in Ethiopia during the military government (1974-1991) was a major hindrance to economic growth.  Since it took power in 1991, the current government has implemented a number of reforms. For instance, in 1994, the government legalized domestic private investment in the banking industry.  In addition, it restructured the two development banks as commercial banks, and introduced a new Banking and Monetary Proclamation that gave more autonomy and further clarified the National Bank of Ethiopia’s activities as the regulator and supervisor of the banking sector.


Economist: 

Manufacturing in Africa: An Awakening Giant
February 7, 2014 

A quiet boom in manufacturing in Africa is already taking place. Farming and services are still dominant, backed by the export of commodities, but new industries are emerging in a lot of African countries." Less than an hour's drive outside Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa, a farmer walks along a narrow path on a green valley floor after milking his cows. Muhammad Gettu is carrying two ten-litre cans to a local market, where he will sell them for less than half of what they would fetch at a dairy in the city. Sadly, he has no transport. A bicycle sturdy enough to survive unpaved tracks would be enough to double his revenues. At the moment none is easily available. But that may be about to change. A construction boom is fostering access to high-voltage power. The spread of mobile telephony, including mobile banking, helps small suppliers struggling with overheads. IBM, an American computer giant with an eye on Africa, goes so far as to say that “software is the manufacturing of the future”. Consumers will still want to buy hardware, but growing local demand is creating a market for African app and software developers


Prof. Shibru Tedla at Meet ETV with Tefera Gedamu
A conversation with Prof. Shibru Tedla, Executive Director, Ethiopian Academy of Sciences (EAS) by Tefera Gedamu : Meet ETV


Ethiopian Foreign Policy & How the Delicate Balance of diplomacy and negotiation should be maintained

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD                                  

IDEA Editorial January 25, 2014

Since the beginnings of people-to-people and state-to-state interaction thousands of years ago, the Horn of Africa has always been a troubled region and by comparison the most volatile and unstable area in Africa. The impetus behind these continuous conflicts is partly induced by geopolitics and foreign intervention and partly engendered by complex mode of productions as well as the mindset and lack of vision of the people


 


In vigilant defense of press freedom
The Ethiopian Reporter

Article 29 of the Ethiopian constitution explicitly guarantees freedom of the press and provides that the press shall, as an institution, enjoy legal protection to ensure its operational independence and its capacity to entertain diverse opinions. This provision is a replica of Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). Article 29 enshrines the right to hold opinions without interference, as well as the right to freedom of expression without any interference including freedom to seek, receive and impart information through any medium of one’s choice. It also prohibits any form of censorship and stipulates that any citizen who violates any legal limitations on the exercise of these rights may be held liable under the law.


 የመጽሃፍ ግምገማ


A Special Love for Assimba: A Psychological Catharsis for 'Kahsay Abraha Besrat'

 Asayehgn Desta, Sarlo Distinguished Professor Sustainable Economic Development

January 4, 2014, I drove from San Rafael to Oakland, California, for about forty-five minutes to have a get-together dinner with one of my best friends, Kidane Haile and learn more about the innovative projects that he is undertaking in Kenya, Nigeria and Morocco.  In the course of our discussion, the owner of the restaurant came and showed us a book entitled “Ya Assimba Fekere” or My Special Love for Assimba.” 


King Menelik Has Investments Here November 7, 1909

Abyssinia’s Ruler said to be a Heavy Buyer of America Railways Stock

Today the Abyssinian ruler has extended the range of his financial operations to the United States, and is a heavy investor in American Railroads. What with his American Securities and his French and Belgian mining investments. Menelik has a private fortune estimated at no less than twenty- five million dollars.  



Ethiopia aims to create new generation of entrepreneurs
By James Jeffrey
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Damenech Zewudie decided it was time to strike out on her own after 33 years working in secretarial and administrative roles for various employers in Addis Ababa.Now she is the proud owner of a two-month-old business selling injera, the large, thin pancake-like staple which is the base of almost every Ethiopian meal."I never used to think about owning a business," Ms Damenech says. "Then I saw how no-one was selling injera where I live - so I took a chance." state-run training and support scheme called the Entrepreneurship Development Programme (EDP).


Accession Number: MO 63.1306

Collection: Gifts from Heads of State

Title: Filigree Bowl

Maker: Maker unknown

Date(s) of Materials: ca. 1960

Place Made: Ethiopia

Medium: Silver, gold plate

Dimensions: 16 3/8"

Description: Footed bowl decorated with eighteen pierced and filigreed lobes of silver. Applied to the rim are gold filigree flowers and a gold crest of His Imperial Majesty.

Historical Note: This bowl was presented to President John F. Kennedy by His Imperial Majesty Haile Selassie, Emperor of Ethiopia (1930-1974), during his state visit to the White House in October 1963.

Gifter: Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia (1930-1974)

Copyright Status: Donated to the United States

Digital Identifier: JFKSG-MO-1963-1306

Subject(s): Gifts

Heads of state

Person(s): Haile Selassie I, Emperor of Ethiopia, 1892-1975

Place(s): Africa

Ethiopia  Source http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset-Viewer/Archives/JFKSG-MO-1963-1306.aspx


Reflections on Africa Competitiveness Report 2013

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

December 27, 2013

 The Africa Competitiveness Report 2013, put out by the World Economic Forum (WE Forum), is a comprehensive analysis and critique of the overall development status of thirty-eight African countries. It has also recommendations on how Africa can uplift itself and successfully become part of the global economy. Based on the World Bank and the African Development Bank (AfDB) data base and recommendations, the Report makes a thorough assessment of African countries’ economic parameters, ranging from their use of information technology to regional integration in the context of other successful countries outside Africa, as well as developed nations that could become major foreign direct investment (FDI) potentials.


Urgent UN-AU Task Force is needed to quell the South Sudan Unrest
December 19, 2013

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon's concern is to be appreciated, but beyond expressions of concerns and admonishes the United Nations and the African Union should establish an emergency task force to intervene in South Sudan before the country descends into an all out civil war. The current skirmish between the forces of President Salva Kiiri and the forces of the ousted Vice President Riek Machar cannot be simply viewed in the context of power struggle; it could easily degenerate into ethnic wars between the Dinka (Kiiri's people) and the Nuer (Machar's people). If the current infighting is not somehow mitigated by a joint UN-AU task force, bloody ethnic clashes could ensue in the predominantly Nuer territory of Likuangola state, which is adjacent to the Gambella Regional State of Ethiopia, and this part of the Horn of Africa may once again witness ethnic cleansing. 
Almost a year ago, that is, on January 9, 2012 the Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) posted a viewpoint entitled “The Tragedy of South Sudan” and we invite our subscribers to read what we have then anticipated: www.africanidea.org/South_Sudan_tragedy.html 


 'GAME CHANGERS' OF IDENTITY POLITICS IN ETHIOPIA  

I am gratified to have this book in my possession and I must thank, first, Gedion Wolde Amanuel for compiling the many articles and essays, including mine that make up the text of this work, and second A. Asamnew for mailing the book to my address. The book is dedicated to Wallelign Mekonnen and Marta Mebrahtu, and more specifically to the 40th anniversary of the sacrifice of these two prominent student leaders. Although the book is for Wallelign and Marta, it also extends credit to all Ethiopian students who equally paid sacrifices for a better Ethiopia. 

 


Tribute to Nelson Madiba Mandela 
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
December 5, 2013

The great Nelson Mandela has departed; he left us for good but his soul, his ideas, and his openly declared determination for the liberation of his fellow Africans lives on. He himself foretold his passing when he remarked on the death of Walter Sisulu ten years ago. Sisulu’s “passing was not unexpected,” said Mandela, “we had long passed the age when either of us would protest against the brevity of life.”
I made reference to the above quote in my eulogy article entitled “Sharing Nelson Mandela’s Grief over the Death of Walter Sisulu” in 2003. In that article, this is what I said in part: I like to share Nelson Mandela’s moving tribute to Walter Sisulu who died on May 6, 2003.In direct contrast to some African leaders who suffer from kleptomania and low self-esteem, Mandela and Sisulu rank among the best and the brightest Africa has ever produced. These two great Africans were comrades-in-arms for more than six decades, whose unflinching stand in the struggle for free South Africa have proved to the world their unparalleled heroism and altruism.


Clash of Civilizations Conundrum and Controversy in The Ethiopian Context
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
December 4, 2013

This essay is intended to address some important issues surrounding 'clash of civilizations' as discussed by Seife Hailu in his article entitled "Is the war of the west equal to the war on the rest? What can we learn from the anti-Ethiopians "wars" in Saudi Arabia?" This article was posted on www.tigraionline.com on November 20, 2013. I am interested in thematically highlighting the points I have concerns with only. Otherwise, the author has done a good job in his overall approach to solving or dealing with a problem, and I like to extend my gratitude to him. In the latter spirit, thus, I am going to make some input by way of critiquing the conceptual framework of "A Clash of Civilization".


Saudi Arabia should be expelled from the UN & Ethiopia should take Serious Diplomatic Measures

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

IDEA Editorial

November 12, 2013

             The rape of Ethiopian women émigré and the physical assault and murder of young Ethiopian men by Saudi thugs on November 11, 2013 is unacceptable, unconscionable, and downright the height of brutality and savagery unparalleled in recent memory. The attack perpetrated by hundreds, if not thousands, of mob gangsters against few innocent Ethiopians was committed under the watch of the Saudi authorities and the latter should be held responsible for the injuries sustained by young Ethiopians and the death of some in the so-called land of the birthplace of Muhammad. Where did the Saudis get this jumbled bias that made them act like wild beasts and take unfettered measures against helpless Ethiopians? One obvious factor that could have contributed to the Saudis negative image of Ethiopians could be the fact that Christian Ethiopians were predominant in the socioeconomic and political realms for thousands of years. I canÂ’t think of any other additional factor that could have contributed to the irrational hatred of Ethiopians.


EXPULSION OF SAUDI ARABIA FROM THE UNITED NATIONS 
By Tecola W. Hagos
 
I. Trafficking in Persons: Slavery 
Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice released the fifth annual Department of State Trafficking in Persons Report on Friday, June 3, 2005 at the State Department. The Report pointed out fourteen Countries around the world as the worst violators of human rights involving trafficking in young women and children as domestics, prostitutes, and farm hands. The hypocrisy of the Bush government is quite jarring, since only a couple of months earlier President Bush, Rice’s boss, was pictured proudly holding the bloody hands of would-be-king Abdullah, the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia whose government had just beheaded eight young Somali men a month earlier on conviction of “armed robbery” under a crude discriminatory legal system.


World Wide Solidarity for the Crying Eritrean Mother 
IDEA, Inc. Editorial
November 7, 2013

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA, Inc.) is calling upon every human being with conscience to extend solidarity and sympathy to the crying Eritrean mothers, epitomized by the courageous mother Weizero Asgedet in the Rome demonstration that came to our attention by Assena Radio. Weizero Asgedet vented on the powers-that-be, who are indirectly the cause for the death of the 365 Eritrean victims at Lampedusa; she was angry, forceful and eloquent, and in just few minutes she reached out the world by her megaphone; she was not literally crying while talking but there is no doubt that her heart was bleeding.


The Suffering of Women in the Two Sudans 
October 30, 2013
The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA, Inc.) has serious concerns about the violence directed by the powers-that-be against the people of Sudan in general and women in particular in the two Sudans. This is not the first time IDEA, Inc. has brought the issue of violence and genocide in the Sudan to the attention of its subscribers. Back in 2007, IDEA presented "Darfur Should Exemplify the End of All Violence in Africa"   http://youtu.be/KOafMZGHkZs


Dear Professor Ghelawdewos,

I just read your review of the fascinating book Tower in the Sky by Hiwot Teffera. Incidentally, I came across it right after I finished reading the book, which I acquired a few days ago. Even though I am long behind you in school and tertiary education, which I completed during the time of the military junta, I can somehow relate myself to the mayhem and murder of that time that affected and ruined the lives of thousands. As a student of Woizero Siheen High School in Dessie, from which hailed those prominent student movement leaders you mentioned, my long standing aspirations and hopes during my elementary school time were not matched by what we encountered during our stay at Woizero Siheen. In those years of 1976/77, when I was a 10th and 11th grade student, teachers and students of the school used to be killed and thrown on the streets like street dogs knocked down by vehicles, as a result of which attending classes was mostly a rare occasion.


Reposted for the 75th Anniversary of Italy's Fascist Crimes in Ethiopia.


Ghelawdewos Araia

This essay will make a brief historical synopsis and analysis of the crimes perpetrated by the Italian fascists against the Ethiopian people in the 1930s. At this particular juncture, it may sound ironic to revisit the crimes against humanity committed in Ethiopia by Fascist henchmen like Marshall Pietro Badoglio and Marshal Rodolfo Graziani, but sometimes the past contends with the present especially if justice has not been served and no official apologies extended by state and/or religious leaders of the perpetrator nation.This essay is also aimed at reinforcing the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, a group of EthiopiansÂ’ initiative in an effort to convince the Vatican and Pope Benedict XVI to apologize to Ethiopians as he has done to the Jews in Germany with respect to the Holocaust committed by the Nazis. As a matter of fact, one of the members of the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, Ato Kidane Alemayehu has written a letter to the Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Vatican_Apology_to_Ethiopia.doc) but to this day no answer was given.


Tower In The Sky

Authored by Hiwot Teffera

                             Addis Ababa University Press, 2012

                             Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

October 17, 2013

Hiwot Teffera has produced a very powerful, scintillating, and captivating book on the Ethiopian People’s Revolutionary Party (EPRP) and the Ethiopian Revolution. It all began with the author’s exposure to the uncharted waters of political philosophy and ideology when one time student leader and revolutionary, Getachew Maru, whom she affectionately calls “my hero”, baptized her. Tower In The Sky is an enduring literary power, especially for the Ethiopian generation that was engaged in protracted wars against the feudo-bourgeois regime of Haile Selassie and the most brutal Derg regime in Ethiopian history.


New Book on Ethiopia 
October 15 2013

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA, Inc.) is delighted to announce a new book on Ethiopia entitled The Ethiopian Student Movement and The National Question: Theory and Practice 1950-1980
Selected and Introduced by Ayalew Yimam (Mukhtar)
Foreword by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia
Readers interested in purchasing the book should contact Ayalew Yimam at ayimam@verizon.com
 


The International Criminal Court and African LeadersÂ’ Concern 
IDEA Editorial
October 11, 2013

The precursor to the International Criminal Court (ICC) is the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 that was called upon by the Commission of Responsibilities. The Paris Conference initiative to establish an international tribunal, however, did not gain currency until the League of Nations addressed the issue again on November 1937, in which only thirteen countries signed but the idea of finding a permanent international tribunal was not ratified. Nevertheless, the idea persisted and this time it was precipitated by the Nuremberg Trials and the Tokyo Tribunals presided over by the Allied Forces following WWII. By 1950, the UN General Assembly was poised to establish an international tribunal, but this initiative too was circumvented by the Cold War. 


Political Socialization in the era of Globalization in Ethiopian Schools

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph. D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development

Abstract:

In contrast to other socialization agencies such as the family, peer groups, religious institutions and the tribal elders, and mass media, there is no doubt that schooling commands nearly undivided attention of students for long hours over many years and remains the most controllable channel for important cognitive and affective political socialization. During Haile SelassieÂ’s regime (1930-1974) in Ethiopia, in addition to regarding education as one of the major players for training and the development of human resources essential for economic growth, the overarching goal of public schooling has been to build national pride, a strong common national identity dominated by one ethnic group, obedience to rules and laws, and the development of respect espousing legitimacy for government and the political institution.


Africans Live On A Continent Owned by Europeans!
By: Mawuna Remarque KOUTONIN

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013 at 1:10 pm.
face-of-the-african-diasporaThe Dream of Europeans is to transform the whole continent into South Africa or Kenya, where a white minority owns and controls the local economy, while Africans are just good like consumers or their servants. The subject is uncomfortable but we need to talk about it, otherwise we will wake up with more Robert Mugabe who is doing a great job redressing centuries of white minority domination and exploitation of Zimbabwean people.LetÂ’s take a look at South Africa, a country where the white minority makes less than 10% of the population but owns more than 80% South African lands and economy. They didnÂ’t buy those lands.


ETHIOPIA: Democracy, Devolution of Power, & The Developmental State
Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) 2013
Authored by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

Reviewed by Tariku Debretsion
Review first published on Amazon September 21, 2013

This book is an essential reading for all who are interested to study and act on the transformation of the Ethiopian state. For far too long, the policies and actions of the elites in power have been directed by existential instinct to cling to power indefinitely, while the oppositions were primarily concerned as to how to ascend to power in the shortest possible time. These have been the linchpins of the vicious cycle of violence that has dragged the nation into the abbeys of misery. The essential question is power for whom and what? Flowery manifestos have been written, ideologies hailed, revolution heralded, savage wars fought and victories declared, yet a modicum of change has occurred in the hapless lives of the people, the bureaucratic institutions and economic edifices.


My Life: My Vision for the Oromo and Other Peoples of Ethiopia
The Red Sea Press, 2013
Authored by Bulcha Demeksa
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
September 19, 2013

Obbo Bulcha, dubbiin kun maal isini fayyadhaa? 
As the title of the book clearly implies, the book is an autobiography but it is also about what the author wants to write on what he knows and believes about the Oromo, as he aptly puts it in the preface of the book. Upon reading the book, I have come to conclude that Bulcha Demeksa is honest and candid in his analysis of the Ethiopian phenomenon. At times he vents anger toward the oppressive machinery that mistreated and exploited the Oromo and other Ethiopian minority nationalities; unlike other Oromo nationalists, however, Bulcha is very much concerned about the Ethiopian nation as he is very much interested in promoting the self-determination of the Oromo people. In this sense, thus, the book is more of advocacy for the cause of the Oromo rather than solicit vision as the subtitle of the book indicates.


Nigeria: The Good News about Economic Growth and Competitiveness
By Ambassador Adebowale Adefuye, 13 September 2013 

guest column
Washington, DC — The World Economic Forum's 2013-2014 Global Competitiveness Index (GCI), as reported 4 September, 2013 [Premium Times] on allAfrica.com, highlighted various countries, including Nigeria. It is important to put the article into the proper context. Since the global economic crisis of 2009, Nigeria has performed better than most countries and still enjoys a 6.1 per cent GDP growth rate despite a drop in the price of oil, its major export. Nigeria maintains single-digit inflation at around 8.6 per cent and is expanding both trade and investment in other sectors outside of the oil industry, particularly in agriculture and infrastructure development. Both Nigeria's banking sector and stock exchange have helped bolster confidence in Nigeria among global financial circles.


Reflections on the Ethiopian Anti-Terrorism Law Debate between the EPRDF and the Ethiopian Opposition Parties
IDEA Viewpoint September 9, 2013
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

The purpose of this essay is to critically appraise the issues surrounding terrorism in general and the Ethiopian Anti-Terrorism Law in particular. This essay would not favor or disfavor any of the contending debaters; on the contrary it would objectively analyze the nature, characteristics, and spirit of the debate.  Before we delve into the central question and points of arguments presented by members of the opposition and the Government, it is important to clearly define terrorism. There is no universally acceptable definition of terrorism, but one conceptually agreed upon definition comes from the United Nations. In 1994, the United Nations General Assembly came up with the following definition of terrorism:


Ethiopia: 2nd U.S - Ethiopia University Linkages Workshop to Be Held
By Nesru Jemal, 31 August 2013 

The 2nd national workshop on building linkages between Ethiopia and U.S. universities organized by the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy will be held 4-5 September 2013 in Addis Ababa.
According to a press release the Embassy issued on Friday, the workshop is aimed at providing an overview of sustainable partnership and focuses on best practices in establishing or expanding mutual beneficial linkages between U.S. and Ethiopian higher learning institutes.



 


The Bureaucratic Empire: Serving Emperor Haile SelassieBy Seyoum Haregot, The Red Sea Press, 2013
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
August 6, 2013
This is a well-written and thoughtful book. It is sharp, stimulating and exquisite and I could not stop reading it. The book is full of authentic anecdotes in relation to the authorÂ’s private and political life and contains five parts and a total of thirty two chapters. The chapters, incidentally, are not the familiar chapters that one encounters in conventional textbooks in terms of length; some of them are indeed one page or one and half pages, but they are precise, concise, and to the point especially in documenting the overall political scenario in Ethiopia during Emperor Haile Selassie. By contrast, Chapter one runs into 51 pages and chronicles the nature and characteristics of governance and political personalities in detail. 


Africa: Computer Model Gives Early Warning of Crop Failure
By Joel Winston, 24 July 2013
 
An international team of researchers has developed a computer model to predict global crop failures several months before harvest. Since 2008, widespread drought in crop-exporting regions has resulted in large increases in food prices on global commodity markets. With climatic extremes also expected to become more common, being able to predict global crop failures could help developing nations that are reliant on food imports - making them more resilient to spikes in food prices.


Tanzania: Education On ARV Use Must Be Enhanced
25 July 2013 

THERE are reports that some HIV/AIDS patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are dodging clinics for various reasons including fear of being identified by people who know them .
A senior medical official with the Bugando Referral Hospital in Mwanza was recently quoted as saying that at least 100,000 people out of 180,000 registered on ARV therapy have abandoned clinics.
Some of those dodging have opted to travel all the way to Shinyanga which is about 164-kms from Mwanza to secure the life-prolonging drugs, while others have abandoned treatment altogether or consult traditional healers for cure of the disease.


Ethiopia: AAU Bestows Full Professorship On Three Scholars
By Online, 24 July 2013 

The Addis Ababa University (AAU) said it has bestowed full professorship on three academics. The University told ENA on Wednesday that the scholars are Dr. Berhanu Kotiso, Dr. Getnet Mitike and Dr. Berhan Tamir. It said the intellectuals have made significant contribution in different fields and research works. The academics fulfilled all the criteria required for the title of full professorship, the University said.


Mozambique: Feeding the Future in Mozambique Through School Meals
23 July 2013 

Albertina Naftal (9) lives with her parents, two brothers and two sisters in a hut made of sticks and grass in the village of Muchenga, in Changara, west of Mozambique.


The Exigency of Religious and Political Toleration in Ethiopia: Reflections on The Tragic Death of Shiek Nur Imam
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
July 20, 2013

In the urgency of the matter with respect to political stability in Ethiopia, it is time for me to once again address the issue of religious and political tolerance in Ethiopia. This essay, in particular, is inspired by the tragic murder of Sheik Nur Imam in Wollo, Ethiopia. Some Diaspora Ethiopians contend that the Sheik, in fact, was murdered by the Ethiopian government1 though their claim is not substantiated with evidence and is very much tuned to what is often described as conspiracy theory. When I was invited by the Ethiopian Law Students Association at Harvard in 2006 as one of the panelists to address “Ethnicity and National Identity in Ethiopia,” I told the audience that I had “a gut feeling that there are some forces who want to disturb the unity of Ethiopians and destabilize Ethiopia, but since I am a scholar and I must address issues based on evidence and scientific analysis, I will not uphold conspiracy theory and/or intuitive reflections.”


Congratulations Ethiopian University Students Class of 2013
IDEA Editorial
July 8, 2013

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. extends its heartfelt congratulations to all 2013 Ethiopian Universities graduates and celebrates their highest academic achievements with them. IDEA is proud to witness the spectacular and remarkable milestone that the Ethiopian students of 2013 have made and have colorfully celebrated in all the university campuses.


Language for whose Audience in the Ethiopian context? A Message to PM Hailemariam Desalegn
IDEA Viewpoint
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

June30, 2003
This viewpoint is intended to critically appraise the mode of communicative language Ethiopians use whenever they want to express their ideas in the form of speech or writing. The majority of educated Ethiopians (high school to advanced degree levels) like to either speak in English or in Amharic or other Ethiopian languages bombarded with English language, even when they address illiterate peasants who don’t understand English at all. It has become increasingly fashionable for urbanite “educated” Ethiopians to use Guramayle (English and Ethiopian languages) to exhibit that they are civilized and modern, but in doing so they have utterly disregarded the majority of Ethiopian people, who apparently are uneducated. They speak without due consideration of their audience, and most importantly they seem to have forgotten that the most sophisticated educated people are those who communicate with their audience in the language that the latter understands.


Egypt Has No Choice but to Cooperate with Ethiopia On The Issue of the Nile 
IDEA Editorial

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD
June 12, 2013

The recent “classified” video on Egyptian Cabinet bluffing in seemingly sophisticated but sinister maneuver against Ethiopia should not come as a surprise. Irrespective of regime change, Egypt consistently pursued a policy that would emasculate any small-scale initiative on the use of the Nile by the riparian states, let alone the construction of a major project like the Grand Renaissance on the Ethiopian side of the Nile.


Egyptian Blooper: Politicians, Unaware They Are on Air, Threaten Ethiopia over 

Ethiopia: 2nd U.S - Ethiopia University Linkages Workshop to Be Held
By Nesru Jemal, 31 August 2013 

The 2nd national workshop on building linkages between Ethiopia and U.S. universities organized by the Public Affairs Section of the U.S. Embassy will be held 4-5 September 2013 in Addis Ababa.
According to a press release the Embassy issued on Friday, the workshop is aimed at providing an overview of sustainable partnership and focuses on best practices in establishing or expanding mutual beneficial linkages between U.S. and Ethiopian higher learning institutes.


 

Exploring an Ethiopian Poet by Pure Accident
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

June 5, 2013

It was a nice spring day and I went out for a quick shopping to the Hamden Plaza in Connecticut, and in the Stop and Shop I bumped into a dignified Ethiopian by the name Gashaw Lake. He was with his wife and daughter and when we were about to greet and introduce each other, in the traditional Ethiopian manner, which has now became increasingly a rare commodity, he lifted his hat and greeted me. I was delighted to encounter the best of Ethiopian values but I must admit that I was subconsciously compelled to reciprocate by bowing while shaking the hand of my Ethiopian brother.In the tradition of poetry, the power of GashawÂ’s poems authenticate reality by successive stanzas and cadences, and these are best exemplified by the many poems dedicated to either family members or random Ethiopian and/or African American personas. For instance, ለጋሼ ሲራክ is for General Sirak Tesfa; ምን ያለ ያገር ሰው is for the late Professor Asrat Woldeyes; Eይዋት ስትናፍቀኝ is obviously for the late famous Ethiopian singer Tilahun Gessesse; ስንብት is dedicated to Abraham Weinshet Workalemahu, and ‘The StatueÂ’ is in honor of Whitney Young, an African American who struggled for human rights. ‘The StatueÂ’, incidentally, has an emancipating power because it represents “a sanctuary for peopleÂ’s rights”.


The Rise of the Sun People: A New Morning Breaks in Africa
Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD May 24, 2013

For the last two decades I have been telling my students that Africa will one day rise, and it looks the time has arrived for a triumphant and jubilant Africa. The golden jubilee of the founding of the OAU (now AU) thus would not simply be a gathering of African heads of states and governments, a conventional conference with underpinning conventional wisdoms, but a landmark in the history of the continent that signals the preliminary achievements of the Lion Kings. It will also signal that, at long last, the sun people have managed to overcome centuries old of obstacles and a new morning has indeed broken in the African continental landscape.


Ethiopia: BBC Reports Ethiopia Has One of World's Fastest Growth Rates
By Zeryhun Kassa, 20 May 2013

Once known for its famines and dependency on foreign aid, Ethiopia now has one of the world's fastest growth rates. This is a report by the BBC in connection to the 50th African Union Anniversary gathering pace to be celebrated in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The report says some of that growth is coming from small businesses - and George Alagiah has been to a shoe factory with a difference in Addis Ababa. Following is the full text of the story George produces from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.


Behind the Façade of Corruption in Ethiopia and what the Government ought to do 
IDEA viewpoint 

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD 
May 12, 2013

Corruption is a very intriguing concept in theory and an elusive human conduct enmeshed in bizarre and rather subtle but toxic human activity, and it is manifested in different forms, as well as assumes different scales and scopes. To be sure, unless there is a system in place to monitor corruption or there is a political system strong enough to mitigate, if not eliminate this disease, it could pervade the larger society like a malignant cancer.


Purchase one book & get the second one for Free
October 3, 2011

The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. once again is launching Cultures That We Must Preserve and Reject (Tigrigna and Amharic), authored by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia. Subscribers interested in buying the book must indicate their selection (Amharic or Tigrigna) and if they decide to purchase the book, they will get Advice to the Son & In Memory to the Father by Belaten Geta Herouy Wolde Selassie for free.
Subscribers must send a check in the amount of $18.00 (this includes shipping and handling), payable to Ghelawdewos Araia, to 1199 Whitney Avenue Suite 523, Hamden, CT 06517  For further information, please call (203) 789-1990 or email       

                              webmaster@africanidea.org 


“Between the Jaws of Hyenas”
A Diplomatic History of Ethiopia (1876-1896)Richard Caulk 

Richard Caulk 
Edited and with an introduction by Bahru ZewdeHarrassowitze Verlag, Weisbaden, 2002
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia 
March 21, 2013


Ethiopia to Open First Industrial Zone to Bolster Economy
By William Davison 
Source Bloomberg

Ethiopia will spend 900 million birr ($49 million) to open its first industrial hub for export- oriented manufacturers in a bid to deliver faster economic growth, Industry Minister Mekonnen Manyazewal said. South Korean garment-makers are among companies in talks with the government about establishing operations at the planned site in the capital, Addis Ababa, Mekonnen said in an interview in the city on March 15. The facility is scheduled to open before the fiscal year ends on July 7, he said.


Pascal Lamy Guest of Honor of a GDN-CUTS Forum
Pascal Lamy, Director General, WTO officiated the signing of a MoU between Global Development Network (GDN) and CUTS International on research and capacity building in developing countries on 

 trade and competition, on 30 January 2013, New Delhi. Speaking on the challenges of global governance at the forum, Lamy said "The current deadlock in international discussions on trade or on climate change and other global issues find their sources in the big geopolitical transformation that accompanies the rise of emerging countries in the world economy." He added that consensus is still lacking on the balance of contributions and benefits between the US, the EU, Japan and the like on the one side, and India, China, Brazil and the like on the other side, particularly on the Doha Round.


Ghelawdewos AraiaÂ’s New Book 2013 Release 
ETHIOPIA
Democracy, Devolution of Power, and The Developmental State 

Note: The Book is a comprehensive survey of democracy, devolution of power, and the developmental state in Ethiopia and critical and comparative analyses of contemporary Ethiopian politics and development programs as indicated in the various chapters. The seventeen chapters of the book are designed to cater scholarly research methodologies and paradigms for academic circles and to serve as handbook for politicians, policymakers as well as political scientists and political economists.


From Economic Dependency and Stagnation to Democratic Developmental State: Essays on the Socio-Political and Economic Perspectives of Ethiopia
Desta, Asayehgn Ph.D. Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California of ventures.  
Fully convinced that the Japanese kaizen management model would be an effective strategy for latecomers like Ethiopia to industrialization and realizing that the contribution of the manufacturing sector to GDP is only about 5 %, employees of thirty pilot companies from Ethiopia were sent to Japan. Chapter 8 therefore reviews the literature and develops a conceptual framework for assessing the transferability of the Japanese “kaizen” management techniques to manufacturing plants in Ethiopia.


Ethiopian Diaspora Politics and the People of Tigray 
Ghelawdewos Araia 
IDEA Viewpoint February 2, 2013

I like to underscore that I am not shaken by the Mickey Mouse politics of Ethiopian Diaspora, who are regretfully a spent force; on the contrary I am at ease with what the Ethiopian people are doing at Home, including the inspiring and hope elevating performance of Ethiopians in such events as ‘Ethiopian Nationalities Day’ and in celebrating their Ethiopian unity. The Ethiopian people have reaffirmed to the world, time and again, that they are steadfast in their unity and their Ethiopian heritage. They have reiterated on many occasions that they would work in unison to transform Ethiopia. I would urge the Ethiopian Diaspora to catch up with Ethiopians at Home and refrain from campaigning against the people of Tigray. The Diaspora has still a chance to safely exit from its current mess and engage in concerted actions that could benefit their motherland.


Re: What language should Ethiopians speak?
Fiseha Haftetsion  January 31, 2013
I am writing this piece in response to Dr. Ghelawdewos ArayaÂ’s article entitled “what language should Ethiopians speak?” published on June 4, 2012 by www.africanidea.org that was inspired, as he said, by my draft article entitled “choosing a working language in multiethnic nations: rethinking EthiopiaÂ’s working language policy”. 


Ethiopia Feeding Itself With Support From WFP's P4P and School Meals Programmes
21 JANUARY 2013

Hanja Chafa — Markos and Elias have received school meals from WFP for the past two years, but the lunch they ate one day in November was special. For the first time ever, the students enjoyed a meal made from crops grown just a few kilometers from their school - purchased by WFP directly from Ethiopian farmers.


Nigeria: Implement Policies On Agricultural Extension for Food Sustainability - DON
26 JANUARY 2013

Prof. Oluwasegun Adekunle of the Department of Agricultural Extension, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Ilorin, has urged the Federal Government to implement policies on agricultural extension for food sustainability. Adekunle, who made the call on Saturday while delivering a lecture entitled: "Key to Unlock" in Ilorin, said for any government to succeed in the agriculture sector, it must implement good policies on agricultural extension


Namibia: The Reality of School vs Education
BY PATRICK SAM, 28 JANUARY 2013

OPINION
THIS article discusses the reality of schools and its implication on education. In modern society, the idea of schools is highly popularized under the assumption that schooling guarantees education, and an education guarantees social mobility. "Back to school, back to reality," were the lyrics of a song traditionally aired on national radio.


EthiopiaÂ’s Diaspora Contribution to EthiopiaÂ’s Development
IDEA Editorial January 18, 2013 
Ghelawdewos Araia

The present generation of Ethiopia is challenged by a calling from the motherland, not to cash-in but to pitch-in for the development of the country, and as Frantz Fanon once aptly put it, “each generation must, out of relative obscurity, discover its mission, fulfill it or betray it.”


Professional Vacancies in Ethiopian Regional States
There are plenty of professional openings currently demanded by the respective regional states of Ethiopia. Qualified Ethiopians in the Diaspora are entitled to apply by presenting their credentials to the region of their choice and the contact person of the regions.


Africa: Raising the Bar on Agricultural Innovation
By Wendy Atkins, 8 January 2013

analysis
Technological innovation, especially in mobile, will be critical to improving agricultural productivity, but R&D funding must be ramped up after years of neglect
When Ismail Serageldin, director of the Library of Alexandria, told the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) that global population growth meant food production would have to increase by 70 percent by 2050, using the same amount of water, he identified agricultural innovation as the key to solving the problem. With global efforts to improve fertilizer quality, harvesting technology and water resources, what role can R&D and mobile communications play in transforming agriculture in Africa?


Ode to the Budding Flowers of Sandy Hook Elementary School 
Ghelawdewos Araia 
December 22, 2012 
Oh what a day is Friday, December twelve two thousand twelve 
A day of carnage at Sandy Hook Elementary 
In Newtown, Connecticut territory


Mali: History, Politics, and Fundamentalism  


Zambia: Govt Introduces Distance-Learning Education Programmes. THE government has introduced distance-learning education programmes from grades eight to twelve in its effort to attain Education for All goals.Launching the 'Alternative Upper Basic and High School Programmes' at Kabulonga High School yesterday, education deputy minister Gunston Chola said the ministry recognised the right for every Zambian to have good quality education and focused on key factors of educational provision such as access, equity and quality maintenance at all level.


FG to Furnish Engineering Laboratories in Polytechnics
The Federal Government has secured funds from the Petroleum Technology Development Funds (PTDF) to furnish the engineering laboratories of one Federal Polytechnic in each of the six geographical zones of the country.


AfricaÂ’s wealth and Western poverty of thought
A response to J. Peter PhamÂ’s New York TimesÂ’ article on the Congo, November 30, 2012
Toussaint Kafarhire Murhula, S.J.2012-12-13, Issue 610
Specifically and to begin with, Mr Pham offers a cost-effective alternative to the squandering of international humanitarian resources that could be reallocated in a better way to relief and development, if the Congo were allowed to fall apart and to break into smaller states that would better governed. He views the UN Security Council’s support of the ‘sovereignty, independence, unity, and territorial integrity’ of what he characterizes as a fictional state as a costly in terms of lives and resources.


IDEA Editorial

Ghelawdewos Araia

The history of Mali is inextricably concatenated to the history of ancient Ghana (not to be confused with present-day Ghana), Songhay, and Kanem-Borno, civilizations that thrived in Western Africa between 700 and 1500 CE. These civilizations were collectively known as the Niger Valley civilizations, and Mali was at the center of all this.


AU Peace and Security Council delays AbyeiÂ’s referral to January meeting
December 14, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – African Union Peace and Security Council (AUPSC) decided to stick to its acceptance to a proposal aiming to hold a referendum next year in Abyei, but did not refer it to the Un Security Council.
Member of the AUHIP, and AUPSC commissioner Ramtane Lamamra, in a meeting held on Friday 14 Dec 2012 to discuss the implementation of the Cooperation Agreement Khartoum and Juba signed on 27 Sept. 2012 (Photo African Union) In a communiqué released on Saturday morning, the AUPSC referred "the determination on the issue of the Final Status of Abyei to its meeting at the level of the Heads of State and Government, to be held on the margins of the 21st Ordinary Session of the Assembly of the Union, in Addis Ababa, in January 2013."


Egypt: Latest Developments of Egypt's Constitutional Referendum
Egyptians began casting their votes in the referendum on the country's new constitution on Saturday.
Below are the latest developments:
Cairo:
. Long queues of women at a Shubra polling station where a veiled woman verbally attacked different media

  outlets and members of Egypt's highest court, an eyewitness said.
. Some polling stations witnessed high turnout, others did not.
. Some Salafis (ultraconservatives) were seen outside one polling station trying to convince voters to vote

  "yes".
. Some voters complained that ballots were not stamped while a judge complained that there were not

   enough staff members to assist voters.
. United States envoy in Egypt Anne Patterson visited some polling stations.


Brave New Voices Trailer
All over the United States, a new generation of poets is emerging. Our HBO series captures teenagers picking up the pen and taking hold of the microphone with passion, intelligence, creativity, honesty and power. Watch the trailer for the original HBO special Brave New Voices and then watch on HBO ON DEMAND. The poets perform some of their best stuff from start to finish. Watch bonus clips now online. Click post title to view. 

Congratulations President Barack Obama on Your Re-Election: What You Need to Do Now!
IDEA Editorial November 7, 2012

Congratulations Barack Obama on your re-election, but now, you know, that you have a great mission to accomplish, a lacunae to fulfill, and a promise to keep. You know, and we all know, that you have come to 

the political platform with a slogan of ‘change’ that you have met partially but not completely. As a result, a significant number of your supporters, especially the young men and women, were confused, disenfranchised, and some of them disgruntled. But they have not opted for quid pro quo, and on the contrary, on Election Day, they came out in significant numbers to make sure that you are re-elected. This, we believe, is a reaffirmation on the part of your supporters that they have faith on you and you should consider yourself as very lucky man, but it is time for you to pay back. Therefore, here are below is a repertoire of what you need to do:


Rodolfo Graziani: A Fascist Hero and the Butcher of Africa 

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D
IDEA Viewpoint

November 2, 2012
Rodolfo Graziani has been dead for the last fifty-seven years, but in 2012 the village of Affile in Italy attempted to resuscitate him by erecting a monument on 

his behalf and the lingering fascist sympathizers. The mayor of Affile, Signor Ettore Viri has been criticized for deciding to dedicate a bust for Graziani, but contrary to negative public reaction, he bragged about his commitment to Graziani by saying, “the head is a dedication of a citizen.” Yes, Graziani could be a citizen and a hero to Ettore Viri and the fascist riffraff, but to Africans he is a butcher fascist murderer.


TO THE GENERAL ATTORNEY OF THE REPOUBLIC OF PRATO

The undersigned Catellini Fulvio, born in Prato on 1/25/1963 and living in 

Montemurlo (Prato), Montalese Street 299, an Italian citizen, enrolled as member of A.N.P.I. (National Association of Partisans of Italy) puts forward and asks, as indicated below, how the mayor of Affile (Rome), Ercole Viri, has unveiled the mausoleum to Rodolfo Graziani, built with funds given by the region. For this project has been spending a sum of at least 1300.00 pounds that it seems is funded by the Lazio Region. 

Translated by Awgania Yecunoamlak from Italian into English


Ethiopia: What the World Bank Thinks About Ethiopia
21 October 2012 

Thinking beyond dogmas is typical of Guang Z. Chen, the resident country director of the World Bank Group (WBG) in Ethiopia. An educational background that took him between the two poles of the existing world, his country of origin, China, and the global superpower, United States, might have contributed to his ability to easily and smoothly sail through the overlapping waters.

Q: Before two weeks, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) has released its Article IV Consultation Staff Report, in which it has provided its view of the Ethiopian macroeconomic environment. The report recommends for the government to facilitate deep structural changes in the economy with a focus on the private sector. Do you share their view?


Announcing A New Organization: A Gift for Ethiopia from Ethiopians

                                    D.E.M.O.C.R.A.T.


Sara Haile-Mariam speaks at One Nation Working Together press conference in NYC

 

Tagged: Africa, Business, Business, External Relations, Governance, Trade, U.S., Canada and Africa
By Andrew Westbury and Witney Schneidman, 10 October 2012 

The U.S. has lagged behind countries such as Brazil and China in its commercial engagement with Africa, just when American markets need it most. It is hard to imagine a feat more challenging in Washington, D.C. today than forging bipartisan consensus in the United States Congress. However, over the past twelve months, finding common ground and unity is exactly what a small group of legislators have done for what many Americans might find a surprising issue: increasing America's trade with Africa.



Somalia: New Start, Stubborn Realities
AfricaFocus Bulletin

Sep 16, 2012 (120916)
(Reposted from sources cited below)
Editor's Note 

The unexpected election of Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, an educator and civil society activist, as the new president of Somalia, has aroused hopes of a new start in that country. But the stubborn realities he and other Somalis face include not only the continuing threat from Al Shabaab, which launched a suicide assassination attack on the new president on September 12. Even more daunting is the challenge of embedded corruption in the government he will head, which has been fostered by a long history of external dependence.


Africa's best time is ahead
By Berhan Ahmed  Friday, 7 September 2012

For the first time in history, African countries have enjoyed a period of strong and sustained growth. The booming African economy has transformed the prospects for ordinary Africans across the continent. According to The Economist, six of the fastest growing economies in the world - Angola, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Chad, Mozambique and Rwanda - are in Africa. Investment in Africa gives greater returns than in any other developing region of the world. The growth in Africa as a whole from 2000-2010 was a little behind Asia, but India and China account for most of that growth.


Post-Meles Ethiopia

The Challenges Ahead and the Collective Responsibility of Ethiopians

Ghelawdewos Araia

September 7, 2012

This essay intends to critically examine the challenges that Ethiopians encounter at this juncture of their history and what they ought to do in the ongoing development and transformation of their nation. In many of my writings, I have reiterated time and again and underscored the significance of collective, communal, and harmonious endeavor in nation building. We must all understand that it is our obligation to pitch in the dynamic development process (that I will fully address in my forthcoming major scholarly work) and not simply observe as bystanders and watch as if miraculously manna is going to drop from heaven.


Meles Zenawi and the unfinished project of Ethiopian modernity
By Teodros Kiros 

The recent death of Meles Zenawi, the architect of Ethiopian modernity has sent tremors of moral shock to the Ethiopian state and other African states, engaged in the murky business of capitalist modernity. 
The strategic Meles attempted to modernize Ethiopia through a market economy, jettisoning the socialist alternative, which characterized, the earlier project of revolutionary Ethiopian modernity, which Meles, following the visions of Chinese thinkers dubbed, the Developmental State. 


Remembering Meles Zenawi

Ghelawdewos Araia  August 21, 2012

As the maxim goes, with all the best intentions in the world some sorrow remains, and there is no doubt that the family and extended family of Meles Zenawi are in deep sorrow for his untimely departure. Before I delve into the remembrance notes I like to extend my condolences to Azieb (Gola) Mesfin and his children.Meles 

Zenawi will be remembered for many things of his contributions, including the conception and plan of Agriculture Development-Led Industrialization (ADLI), a blue print for EthiopiaÂ’s development; for his leadership in the establishment of higher institutions of learning (at least twenty universities have been established under his leadership) and the expansion of schools in the urban and rural areas; for his leadership in road construction and major development infrastructures such as the Millennium Dam; for his leadership in various capacities in the African Union (AU), including his chairmanship of New African Partnership for Development (NEPAD).


The Emergence of a Dual-System of Primary Schooling in Ethiopia Desta, Asayehgn Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable Economic Development, Dominican University of California
Based on the manpower planning process where schooling is considered an important tool for the training of a workforce, an essential prerequisite for economic growth, and an effective instrument of citizenship training, the central goals of schooling in Ethiopia during Haile SelassieÂ’s reign were to build a limited number of trained human resources, instill obedience to the established authority, and to develop respect for the then existing political institutions. Stated differently, the few schools that existed in Ethiopia during Haile SelassieÂ’s reign were not only elitist but were designed to maintain respect for the existing order. 


Beyond Politics and Innuendo: Preserving Our Humanity and Salvaging Ethiopia from Moral Decadence

 Ghelawdewos Araia & Teodros Kiros

Viewpoint    August 6, 2012                   

Reasoned dialogue, guided by a more loadstar, and propelled by the public reason of the Ethiopian people must lead the way.  The precondition for our proposal, however, is the unity of the Ethiopian people and as per the wisdom of Corinthians and our forefathers, we urge our fellow Ethiopians to be “completely united with only one thought and one purpose.” 


Ethiopia: Police Arrest Muslim Protesters As Clashes Continue
By Tesfa-Alem Tekle, 22 July 2012 

Addis Ababa — Ethiopian police on Sunday said that they had arrested several people after violent clashes between police and Muslim protesters continued on Saturday in the capital, Addis Ababa. The clash occurred at Anawar Mosque following noon prayers. "Protesters blocked worshipers from leaving the Mosque compound. They hold them hostage until riot police forces took situation under control" Deputy Police commissioner Girma Kassa said.


Sabila

My dear Sabila, 

I am saddened by your departure

YouÂ’ve left us too soon

And I never got a chance

To examine your caricature

You and I have never met

We did not converse one-to-one either

But I have known you very well

You are part of my soul

Part of my spiritual bowl

From which I drink the sacred oil  


 Proposed Federal GovÂ’t Budget Embraces Macroeconomic Loopholes; Risky! 
Both proponents and critics of the Revolutionary Democrats concur that ambition is their defining character. They have carried it through two decades of leading this rather volatile nation. It has existed in the highs and lows of their time in power, as if it is the oxygen of their administration.


Ethiopia: Genomics and African Queens
21 June 2012 
  AllAfrica.com

Researchers have started to unveil the genetic heritage of Ethiopian populations, who are among the most diverse in the world, and lie at the gateway from Africa. They found that the genomes of some Ethiopian populations bear striking similarities to those of populations in Israel and Syria, a potential genetic legacy of the Queen of Sheba and her companions.
The team detected mixing between some Ethiopians and non-African populations dating to approximately 3,000 years ago. The origin and date of this genomic admixture, along with previous linguistic studies, is consistent with the legend of the Queen of Sheba, who according to the Ethiopian Kebra Nagast book had a child with King Solomon from Israel and is mentioned in both the Bible and the Qur'an.


What Language Should Ethiopians Speak?
Ghelawdewos Araia  June 4, 2012

This essay attempts to resolve the age-old controversy of the use of one language in Ethiopia as a lingua franca or a working language, and will discuss the anatomy of language, not only in its narrow definition related to the mechanical facilitation of communication but also in its broader conception of expressing and embodying culture in the micro and macro senses.The power of emotive language could be gained via indigenous languages only. I have had the opportunity to experience the power of language, 


My Graduate Students

These graduate students that you see in the group photo below were in my classes, Global Political Economy and Research in International Studies (IS 597 70 and IS 598 70 respectively) at Central Connecticut State University (CCSU). Most of them have taken several classes with me, including International Diversity and Integration (IS 571 70); some of them have already begun developing their theses (see topics in parenthesis against their names); they are a dynamic and cohesive group in the midst of Blue Devils and they have a bright future ahead of them. I WISH THEM ALL THE BEST!  


WALDEBA MONASTRY AND WOLKAYITE IRREGATION PROJECT  A lot have been said about this topic through the different medias recently. For the majority of us, it is still a conundrum we longed for the real picture and the truth..


Libya: Deserting Refugees in the Sahara
By Rebecca Murray, 13 May 2012

Kufra — As dusk settles over the isolated Saharan town Kufra, young guards order a few hundred migrants lined up at a detention centre to chant "Libya free, Chadians out", before they kneel down for evening prayers. Most of the prisoners in the small, squalid compound called the Freedom Detention Centre - run by Kufra's military council - are from Chad. Hundreds more, from Somalia, Eritrea and Ethiopia, were moved to bigger facilities due to overcrowding. Almost 1,000 miles from the Mediterranean coast in Libya's desolate southeast desert, the Kufra oasis strategically lies near the long and porous borders of Egypt, Sudan and Chad.


Sudan Conditions Pullout of Abyei On Forming Administrative Body
Khartoum — The Sudanese government has conditioned withdrawal of its troops from Abyei on the formation of an administrative body as agreed with South Sudan last year, warning that otherwise a vacuum would be created in the hotly-contested region.
South Sudan has already pulled out troops from Abyei last week, prompting the African Union (AU) and the United Nations (UN) to call on Khartoum to follow suit.
The move followed a UN Security Council's resolution ordering the two countries to withdraw troops from disputed border regions and resume negotiations on post-secession issues with a three-month deadline to conclude them.


A Season of War in the Horn of Africa 
Can another all out war be prevented? 
At the London Conference on Somalia this year, a plan of ac­tion was unveiled to find a way out of that conflict. But with underlying tensions between Ethiopia and Eritrea, and charges that the London conference was little more than a PR exercise to ‘rubber stamp’ a solution designed by international actors, little was accomplished. Our panel of speakers will address the current dilemma and explore pathways to peace
Date Apr. 26. 2012
Time: 6.30p.m-9.00 p.m
Contact # 212-244-3123
to RSVP: newsdesk@mindspring.com


Speakers
Ghelawdewos Araia,Kassahun Checole and Said Samatar 


A season of War in the Horn of Africa: Can another all out war be avoided?

Global Information Network

146 W 29th St
Suite 7E
New York, NY (map)
40.747288 -73.992157

We're between 6th and 7th aves. on the 7th floor
At the London Conference on Somalia in February, a plan of action was unveiled to find a way out of the conflict in Somalia. But with underlying tensions between Ethiopia and Eritrea, and charges that the London conference was little more than a PR exercise to ‘rubber stamp’ a solution designed by international actors, little was achieved. On April 26, the Africa Roundtable will host a panel of distinguished scholars, activists, and academics from the region to explore pathways to peace. Please join us in welcoming Profs. Ghelawdewos Araia, Kassahun Checole, and Said Samatar for a provocative dialogue on this important topic. Your questions will be entertained after the talk.


Europe/Africa: Underdeveloping Africa (Again)
AfricaFocus Bulletin
Mar 21, 2012 (120321)

Africa is in trouble. Its future is once again on the table, and it is Europe that holds the ace. Unlike the Berlin Conference of 1884 to 1885 which balkanized Africa among 13 European powers as guaranteed sources of raw materials and market, the current contraption under the Economic Partnership Agreements (EPAs) spearheaded from Brussels is the modern day equivalent of the Berlin Conference.


President Obama Welcomes President Mills of Ghana to the White House
Washington, DC 


The Integration of Technical and Vocational Education and Training with Sustainable Development Education: A Review of African Case Studies

 

Desta, Asayehgn, Ph.D.

Sarlo Distinguished Professor of Sustainable International Economic Development

Dominican University of California

Abstract

With the emancipation of the Rio Conference of 1992 and the Johannesburg Conference of 2002, Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) has been regarded as the key component of implementing sustainable development.  In particular, the Technical and Vocational Education Training (TVET) for entrepreneurs has been identified as a vehicle for the implementation of education for sustainable development.  To assess the effective integration of ESD in TVET, four of the six case studies undertaken by UNESCO in 2009 in Eastern and Southern Africa  (i.e., Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, and Mauritius) were reviewed by the author to solicit information as to whether the objectives of ESD have been achieved by the TVET programs.


Fisseha Abraha, the Family man from the North
By Teodros Kiros

Few are genuinely brave. Brave are those who are made out of moral discipline
and still disposition. Such rare individuals blend in one whole -compassion and firmness.
Such was Fisseha Abraha, the gallant man from the north. A brother to Seeye Abraha, an Ethiopian hero, Fisseha has paid heavy price for speaking power to truth and was imprisoned in Ethiopian dungeon on false charges. Those days in prison have cost him his health. It is said that while in prison he was confined with six hundred others whose sweats were literally dropping on his body against which he attempted to protect himself by covering himself with plastic bags to no avail. 


Let the Nkrumah Statue Stand and Let Other Statues Flank and Accompany It 

 Ghelawdewos Araia Phd.

February 18, 2012

In any event, notwithstanding the inaccuracy with respect to the pan-African movement and the founding of the Organization of African Unity (OAU, renamed African Union –AU – in 1999), controversies in whatever form presented, and insofar they are substantive, are healthy and must be encouraged. In the latter spirit, thus, I like to join the chorus but only with a fervid intention of presenting a scholarly-cum-historical synopsis of pan-Africanism, a powerful movement that incidentally paved the way for the founding of the OAU.  



Archaeologists strike gold in quest to find Queen of Sheba's wealth
Dalya Alberge 

The Observer, Saturday 11 February 2012
A British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve 

the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba derived her fabled treasures A British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba of biblical legend derived her fabled treasures. Almost 3,000 years ago, the ruler of Sheba, which spanned modern-day Ethiopia and Yemen, arrived in Jerusalem with vast quantities of gold to give to King Solomon. Now an enormous ancient goldmine, together with the ruins of a temple and the site of a battlefield, have been discovered in her former territory. Louise Schofield, an archaeologist and former British Museum curator, who headed the excavation on the high Gheralta plateau in northern Ethiopia, said: "One of the things I've always loved about archaeology is the way it can tie up with legends and myths. The fact that we might have the Queen of Sheba's mines is extraordinary."


A Very Important Book on Ethiopian Traditional Medicine
The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. invites all to read this very important book (Amharic) entitled Ethiopian Traditional Medicine in Scientific Perspective: Herbal Medicine. The author, Dr. Fekadu Fulas, a Ph.D. in pharmacognosy (study of medicinal drugs obtained from plants and other natural sources) has presented a well-researched and well-written book on Ethiopian traditional herbal medicine. Important themes discussed in the book range from the knowledge of chemical properties of herbs, to the various types of herbs and their usage in North America, Europe, China, Africa, and Ethiopia (Chapter 1).
Chapter 2 is about the history of Ethiopian traditional medicine; regulation to control the medicines; on diseases; etiology and side effects of traditional medicine; and branches of traditional medicine and the training of experts

 


Access Capital adds its own to the on-going debate on EthiopiaÂ’s economic performance 
By Keffyalew Gebremedhin

AccessÂ’s view of two pillars of development
Access Capital just published its third Ethiopia: Macroeconomic Handbook 2011-2012, to sell its views and ideas on prospects and problems of EthiopiaÂ’s economy. The handbook contains several useful data on activities of the different sectors of the national economy, accompanied by analyses from a business perspective that Access Capital truly represents with lots of hunger and drive.


Interview on Contemporary Ethiopia: Lessons Learned
Desta, Asayehgn Ph.D. 

On January 17, 2012, I read an interesting interview given to the Ethiopian Observer website by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia. Generally, if we look at it from the standpoint of art, a discourse between a journalist and an interviewee is very intriguing. But, what was amazing to me was the relevance of the questions used by the interviewer (Ethio-observer). They caught my eyes, vibrated my brain, and highly motivated me to read and examine the content of the interview process and learn from the interviewee. The types of questions used by the interviewer were very instructive, well prepared, and objectively designed to elicit the expert views of the well-known and highly respected historian and political economist, Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia. In short, the questions were well researched and the interviewer seemed to have read the enumerable articles and books authored by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia. 


US sets eyes on Africa
By Jenny Lei Ravelo on 19 January 2012 
ThereÂ’s more to Africa than just war, famine and drought, and the United States is quick to see this as it boosts investments in the region
At the “Opportunity: Africa” conference, held in Wilmington, Del., the heads of the U.S. Agency for International Development and the Millennium Challenge Corp. spoke of their latest work in the fast-emerging region. USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah said the agency launched a major effort to move 30 percent of its funding this year to the private sector, entrepreneurs and local civil society organizations in Africa. MCC CEO Daniel Yohannes, meanwhile, said the agency is investing in roads, airports and ports in Africa to expand trade and commerce in the region. He said MCC is constructing a new terminal at the Bamako Airport in Mali and rehabilitating major roads in Tanzania. 

 

 


Keynote by MCC CEO Daniel W. Yohannes at the Delaware-Africa Conference
Sustainable Economic Development and Trade with Africa

Thank you so much! ItÂ’s great to be in Delaware, the home state of our esteemed Vice President Joe Biden.  ItÂ’s also great to be here with Senator Christopher Coons, who is an outstanding advocate for Delaware and for the American people. I want to thank him for inviting me to speak here this afternoon. The SenatorÂ’s visionary leadership as chairman of the African Affairs subcommittee is breaking new ground on how we work with Africa.


Africa: Kenya - Impunity & Elections, 1
"Public support for the ICC remains high. A majority of the respondents - 64 per cent - are happy that the ICC is pursuing the six suspects. ... the perception that the government is unlikely to conduct genuine investigations, or prosecute powerful individuals, has sustained high support for the ICC as the justice mechanism of last resort." - Kenya National Dialogue and Reconciliation (KNDR) Monitoring Project, January 2012
Opening a very complex year of legal and political developments in Kenya, the International Criminal Court today issued pre-trial indictments against four prominent Kenyan political figures, including rival presidential candidates William Ruto and Uhuru Kenyatta, for crimes during the post-electin violence in late 2007 and 2008 (see http://www.icc-cpi.int /direct URL http://tinyurl.com/7ysluo5) Charges were also issued against Cabinet Secretary Francis Muthaura and radio executive Joshua Arap Sang. Charges were not filed against two other suspects, Postal Corporation chief Hussein Ali and suspended government minister Henry Kosgey.


Interview on contemporary Ethiopia January 17, 2012
Ethioobserver has conducted a comprehensive interview on major issues and current affairs pertaining to Ethiopia with Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia, and while we are pleased to present a discussion forum to our subscribers, we also like to extend our deepest gratitude to the interviewee for his cooperation and his time.

Ethioobserver: What is your advise to Meles Zenawi and the EPRDF regarding the overall governance and politics in Ethiopia?
Dr. Ghelawdewos: My advice could be two-penny worth, but it is at least clear and simple. Meles and the EPRDF should completely change (if they could) their exclusive domination of state power and accommodate opposition parties like Forum; 


Ethiopia Sale of State Assets Would Raise $7.6 Billion
January 11, 2012, 10:11 AM EST

Jan. 11 (Bloomberg) -- EthiopiaÂ’s government would raise 132 billion birr ($7.6 billion) if it sold the countryÂ’s five biggest state-owned companies to private investors, Access Capital SC said.


By Nancy Wick, University of Washington (Seattle) | January 8, 2012
Raymond Jonas went to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts one day when he was in town for a conference, aiming to see an exhibit of European art. But on the way out, he stumbled onto a photography exhibit with one arresting image.

The Tragedy of South Sudan
IDEA Viewpoint
Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D. January 9, 2011

In 1997, I had serious concerns with the conflict-ridden Horn of Africa and attempted to address the political instability surrounding Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, and Sudan. I suggested that members of the Inter-Governmental Agency for Development (IGAD), the United States, and the United Nations engage in concerted efforts to peacefully resolve the conflicts. I further argued, “Members of IGAD must utilize their Agency to promote peace and not war. For one thing, the continuation of war for the peoples of Eritrea and Ethiopia (who were yearning for peace for three decades) would be totally unfair, and for another development agendas will be curtailed and altogether stifle any meaningful reconstruction. …To avoid the coming political quagmire, peaceful resolution to the conflict should be initiated by IGAD members themselves, i.e.


The Good and the Ethiopian condition
By Teodros Kiros

In a very recent wise article, (Ethiopians Must Garner A Higher Form of Unity in Light of Kebede Michael Vision, Ghelawdewos Araia December 27, 2011) Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia advises us to aim at discovering our higher selves and garner a higher form of unity in light of Kebede MichaelÂ’s Vision, and disembark from the destructive path of hammering on obsessions with the psychological makeup of our leaders. He alternatively suggests that:


Ethiopians Must Garner A Higher Form of Unity in Light of Kebede Michael Vision
Ghelawdewos Araia

December 27, 2011
This essay is intended to further reach out Ethiopians at home and in the Diaspora in an effort to emancipate themselves from narrow ethno-politics that has virtually gripped the minds of political groupings, apparently vocal and avowed opposition but that altogether lacks unity.


Tigray Announces Acquisition of the 795 Square Kilometre Harvest North Properties in Ethiopia
Press Release: Tigray Resources Inc. – Mon, Dec 19, 2011 

VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA--(Marketwire -12/19/11)- Tigray Resources Inc. (TSX-V: TIG.V - News) ("Tigray" or the "Company") is pleased to announce it has entered into a non-binding agreement with respect to a three-year option to acquire up to an 80% interest in the Harvest North properties from an arm's length party. The Harvest North properties cover 795 square kilometres immediately adjacent north and west of Tigray's existing Harvest project in Ethiopia. 


1. በ ስመ ኣብ
Bä sime aab

In the name of the Father
በስመ ኣብ ወ ወልድ ወ መንፈስ ቅዱስ Aሃዱ Aምላክ
Bä sime aab wä wold wä menfes qidus ahadu amlak
In the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit 


The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. is delighted to announce a new book by Ayalew Yimam. The title of the book is YANKEE GO HOME: The Life of an Ethiopian Revolutionary & The Fall of Assimba, EPRP's Red Base


Modern Ethiopian History Series 
The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA) presents modern Ethiopian history in the context of diplomatic reports and dispatches. This series of publications would enable Ethiopian historians and scholars on Ethiopian history to galvanize their research toward writing theses, dissertations and books. In a classroom setting, teachers and/or professors can cite them for the purpose of historical discourse.


Ethiopian Illicit Outflows Doubled In 2009, New Report Says 
Ethiopia lost $11.7 billion to outflows of ill-gotten gains between 2000 and 2009, according to a coming report by Global Financial Integrity. ThatÂ’s a lot of money to lose to corruption for a country that has a per-capita GDP of just $365. In 2009, illicit money leaving the country totaled $3.26 billion, double the amount in each of the two previous years. The capital flight is also disturbing because the country received $829 million in development aid in 2008. According to GFI economist Sarah Freitas, who co-authored the report, corruption, kickbacks and bribery accounted for the vast majority of the increase in illicit outflow “The scope of EthiopiaÂ’s capital flight is so severe that our conservative US$3.26 billion estimate greatly exceeds the US$2 billion value of EthiopiaÂ’s total exports in 2009,” Freitas wrote in a blog post on the website of the Task Force on Financial Integrity and Economic Development. 


QYenesew Gebre an Embodiment of Existential Seriousness
 By Teodros Kiros

The face is elegantly thin. The eyes are large. The mouth is slightly open, betraying an ambiguous smile. The forehead is big, born to think for the Ethiopian world by being the voice of the voiceless, the eyes of all those who cannot see, the healer of all those whom he touched and the caring mind of those who cannot think freely, lest they are silenced by the guns of tyranny.


The Egyptian Military Must Yield to Civilian Democratic Rule in Egypt

IDEA Editorial

Ghelawdewos Araia November 23, 2011

Now, in retrospect, the phrases “we may not figure out the definite trajectory of the movements,” and “we must be cautiously optimistic,” could be argued, they were statements in anticipation of the second gathering of the Egyptian people at Tahrir Square in the last week of November of 2011 to demand democratic civilian rule in Egypt. 


The African Union Must Devise A Long-Term Somalia Redemption Project

IDEA Editorial

November 20, 2011

The troubled Horn of Africa Region, epitomized by the torn-apart Somali nation, whose people seem to have opted for an intriguing and paradoxical decision to dismember their own country. For all practical purposes, at this juncture of history, the Republic of Somalia that prevailed as an independent nation on the political map between 1960 and 1991 does not exist now. Sadly, now we have three Somali nations, namely Somaliland, Puntland, and Mogadishu (the beleaguered Somali proper), and soon we may witness a fourth Somali nation: Jubaland.


I Love Sonia Sanchez

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD

November 4, 2011

Sonia Sanchez came to Lehman College of the City University of New York on November 3, 2011 and in her honor I took my African Civilization class with me to the Lovinger Theater where she read her poem.

I had the honor to meet this wonderful woman of great stature in the world of poetry and literature. Once she began reading her poems, instantaneously I felt as if the Harlem Renaissance was reenacted with new dimensions and vistas.  There is no doubt that Sonia Sanchez is the direct descendant of the Harlem literary giants. The more she read, the more I felt as if a vibrant literary renaissance and cultural regeneration was taking place. Sonia Sanchez entertained the audience by her wit and sense of humor and the many genre of poetry that she read. She read poems that she wrote for Bill Cosby, Martin Luther King, and Toupak etc. She read love poems and captivated the audience.  


HUMAN RIGHTS CRISIS: HOW THE EUPHORIA OF INDEPENDENCE TURNED INTO A NIGHTMARE FOR THE ERITREAN PEOPLE                

Bahlbi Yemane  November 6, 2011

 A prominent Greek speech writer, Demosthenes once wrote “every dictator is an enemy of freedom and an opponent of law.” This has been proven exactly right when it comes to modern Eritrean political reality. Some of us are lucky enough to have lived in democratic societies where leaders are elected to serve the people; where people have all the fundamental rights to shove them out of office when they failed to live up to their promise.


Africa Nears Agreement on Continental Infrastructure Plan With Accord in Morocco 
10/31/2011
African states came closer to finalizing a continental programme for the development of vital infrastructure as talks ended in Morocco at the weekend. North African countries agreed on priority projects at the last round of regional consultations by the promoters of the Programme for Infrastructure Development in Africa (PIDA) in Rabat, Morocco. PIDA is an initiative of the African Development Bank (AfDB), the African Union Commission and the


WOLLO: Microcosm Ethiopia and Exemplar of Ethiopian Unity
Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

October 22, 2011
Literally and figuratively speaking, Wollo is the central locus and the heart of Ethiopia. By virtue of its geographical location, Wollo, both in the distant past and the annals of contemporary Ethiopia, served as the rendezvous point for major Ethiopian nationalities, and by way of reflecting on this reality, on November 2, 2005, in a brief Amharic article entitled ‘The Question of Nationalities and Ethiopian UnityÂ’ or in Amharic የብሔር ጥያቄና የIትዮጵያ Aንድነት I wrote the following:



WORLD ASSOCIATION OF PARISHIONERS OF E.O.T. CHURCH
4002 Blacksmith Drive, Garland, TX 75044 www.eotcipc.org


United States Foreign Policy Towards Africa

FROM THE AFRICAN EXECUTIVE
Africa: Surviving the Global Jungle

New challenges and opportunities
The use of the images of ‘village’ or ‘jungle’ has decisive implications for Africa’s choice and strategy for action. In what follows, For clarity I summarise some of the features that distinguish a jungle from a village: A village is a low risk space; a jungle high risk. A village is compassionate and caring; a jungle hostile and ferocious. A village is inclusive; a jungle is restrictive. A village is regulated by rules; a jungle by power. A village is co-operative; a jungle competitive. A village is sharing; a jungle selfish.


Black Student College Graduation Rates Inch Higher But a Large Racial Gap Persists
Source: The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education

Nationwide, the black student college graduation rate remains at a dismally low 43 percent. But the college completion rate has improved by four percentage points over the past three years. As ever, the black-white gap in college graduation rates remains very large and little or no progress has been achieved in bridging the divide. Most important, in view of the huge penalty race discrimination has imposed on African Americans in the United States, is the fact that blacks who complete a four-year college education have a median income that is now near parity with similarly educated whites. 


AfricaÂ’s Friend China Finances $9.3 Billion of Hydropower
By Randall Hackley and Lauren van der Westhuizen 

When completed in 2013, Gibe III on EthiopiaÂ’s Omo River will be AfricaÂ’s tallest dam, a $2.2 billion project that conservationists say will deprive birds and hippos of vital habitat. Some 600 miles (965 kilometers) to the north, Sudan is preparing to build the $705 million Kajbar dam on the Nile, which would inundate historic towns and tombs of the Nubian people, descendants of the pharaohs of ancient Egypt. The $729 million Bui project on the Black Volta River, to be finished in 2013, will boost GhanaÂ’s hydropower capacity by a third -- and flood a quarter of Bui National Park while displacing 2,600 people. 


Martin Luther King would be elated, but not completely satisfied
Ghelawdewos Araia
September 7, 2011

Professor West blames President Obama for falling “tragically short of fulfilling KingÂ’s prophetic legacy.” I donÂ’t think this is a fair statement, but I suspect that Cornel West has subconsciously but falsely assumed that a Black president could have dramatically and/or miraculously solve the African-American problem. In point of fact, he seems to forget that Obama is an American president who happens to be black and he does not exclusively represent African-Americans (and he should not) nor does he serve as a spokesman for black people. If he does, he should be the head of the NAACP or the Urban League and not the president of the United States. The only problem I see with Obama is his claim of “I am the dream,” a parenthetically misleading claim that needs to be scrutinized and criticized. Just because we have a black president does not logically follow that we are witnessing a post-racial American society. 


Justice for Shweyga: Appeal to World Conscience!
IDEA Viewpoint September 3, 2011

The world has now testified the gruesome and horrendous criminality of the Gaddafi family. The poor Ethiopian lady, Shweyga Mullah, found herself in DanteÂ’s Inferno in 

Tripoli. Her crime: for refusing to beat a crying child! And for this, she paid the ultimate price of being burned by hot water, poured on her entire body – head to toe – by a sadistic and cruel monster by the name Aline Skaf, the wife of Hannibal, Gaddafi’s son. The barbaric act committed by Aline against Shweyga is crime against humanity, and other crimes of similar nature, including burning maids and nannies with hot water and executing political prisoners, was the shocking revelation that humanity encountered this week in Libya.


How an Ethiopian slave became a South African teacherSandra Rowoldt Shell
University of Cape Town

When Neville Alexander used to visit his maternal grandmother Bisho Jarsa as a boy, he never suspected 

the extraordinary story of how she had come from Ethiopia to the South African city of Port Elizabeth. 
Bisho was one of a group of Ethiopian slaves freed by a British warship in 1888 off the coast of Yemen, then taken round the African coast and placed in the care of missionaries in South Africa. "We were overawed in her presence and by the way she would mumble to herself in this language none of us understood," recalls Mr Alexander, now 74. This was Ethiopia's Oromo language, Bisho's mother tongue, which she reverted to as she grew older. Mr Alexander, who was a political prisoner in the 1960s, sharing Robben Island with Nelson Mandela, is today one of South Africa's most eminent educationists.


WorldÂ’s Top 10 Coffee-Producing Countries in 2010-2011
By Justin Doom - Aug 19, 2011 

The following is a table of the worldÂ’s 10 largest coffee-producing nations, measured in thousands of bags, for the 2010-2011 crop year. One bag weighs 60 kilograms (132 pounds). 
Data are from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 
1) Brazil 54,500
2) Vietnam 18,725
3) Colombia 9,500
4) Indonesia 9,325
5) India 5,100
6) Ethiopia 4,400
ARABICA BEANS: 
1) Brazil 41,800
2) Colombia 9,500
3) Ethiopia 4,400


The Wise Mouse and The Lion that Ate Corrupt Bureaucrats!
Ghelawdewos Araia
August 16, 2011 

But I have this bad habit of being tempted to say something. Although I promised not to indulge in interpreting the story of the lion and inject my bias, I like to make this passing and concluding remark: The power of metaphor is that it can authenticate reality by dramatizing stories represented by fictional characters, like the cat, mice, lion, and bureaucrats. And remember, since time immemorial, the symbol of Ethiopia was the lion! For that matter, the lion is also the symbol of all Africa, but in the Serengeti, the lions eat antelopes, gazelles, and zebras and only when they are desperate do they try human flesh.


What went wrong in Eritrea?
Eritrea's hard-won independence promised much for the future, but instead it brought repression, war, secrecy and international pariah status One can only surmise what is really happening in this small country of 4.5 million, whose young people are fleeing to neighbouring countries, where rationing is widespread, independent media do not exist, and all accurate data is government property. I suspect there is a drought in Eritrea, although its effect may not be as severe as in Somalia or other neighbouring countries. But Eritreans are used to going hungry.
• Dawit Mesfin, an Eritrean, is principal director of Justice Africa, UK


GREEK MYTHOLOGY, as Part of My Summer Reading 
By Aphilas Araia
August 7, 2011

The narration below is based on Rick RierdianÂ’s book Percy Jackson and The Olympians of the Titan Curse. The book is about Greek mythology; it is about Greek heroes who try to defend their Olympian parents from being overthrown by half bloods (half god, half human) who betrayed the Olympians because they were mad at them. There are good half bloods and bad half bloods; the heroes are good half bloods. 


RANDOM RYMES!
By Aphilas Araia
August 7, 2011


Ghana: We Smell 'Dutch Disease' in Oil Sector

The Civil Society Platform on Oil and Gas is raising the concern that Ghana has already started showing signs of the Dutch Disease, few months into the production of oil and gas in the country. The Platform's Coordinator, Mohammed Amin Adam, addressing the opening of the Summer School of the Africa Regional Extractive Industries Hub at the Ghana Institute of Management and Public Administration (GIMPA), noted though it is early days, analyses of the first quarter of the economy shows that the country is on the path of developing the unpopular phenomenon often associated with oil producing countries.


The Institute of Development and Education for Africa (IDEA), Inc. Hails the 31st Annual International Conference on Critical Thinking 
July 25, 2011

IDEA congratulates the organizers of the 31st Annual International Conference on Critical Thinking that will be held near University of California at Berkeley from July 25 to July 28, 2011. 


Axumite Hertiage

One of the Ethiopian Development Council's (ECDC) missions is to conduct humanitarian and development programs in the Horn of Africa. To this end, ECDC has shipped 867,212 books estimated at $44.5 million since 1992 for distribution to Ethiopian schools and libraries, including the Afar, Amhara, Benishangul-Gumz, Oromia, South Nations, Nationalities and Peoples, and Tigray regions. In Addis Ababa, ECDC has responded to requests from Addis Ababa University Library, its Law, Medical and Pharmacy Schools. 


Africa's Future Education Conference


The Benefits of Tolerance and A Vision of New Ethiopiawinet

By Metshet Wubneh

July 11, 2011

The fundamental rule of politics is tolerance. Without tolerance there is no politics. Politics is a special kind of friendship and friendship itself is ground on respect. Friends respect each other by listening to one another and by caring to each other. Similarly, a large number of people who wish to attain a goal seek to cultivate a kind of friendship that is suitable for political life, where total strangers come to the political arena to articulate a way of life by listening to one another and respecting each otherÂ’s views, however divergent and irreconcilable those views are.


Saluting The Wonderful Ethiopian Intellectuals

Ghelawdewos Araia

June 27, 2011

Given the current intellectual crisis among the Ethiopian Diaspora I have become increasingly nostalgic to the rich scholarly legacy of my former professors at Addis Ababa University (AAU) and the brilliant University Students Union of Addis Ababa (USUAA) militants who were prolific writers and gifted public speakers. Some of my mentors are still around but a significant number of them have vanished in due course of the Ethiopian Revolution. One of the objectives of this essay is to acknowledge the scholarly and intellectual contributions of these wonderful Ethiopians, without whom, I sincerely believe, I could not have made the achievements of education that I have attained and the professorial career that I have today. And it is for this apparent reason that I have quoted Isaac Newton in my debut book, Ethiopia: The Political Economy of Transition, and attributed his celebrated maxim (‘If I have been able to see farther than others it was because I stood on the shoulders of giants’) to my exemplar par excellence Ethiopian intellectuals.


KAHSAY G/EGZIABIHER IS ASKING FOR SPONSORSHIP OF HIS FUTURE BOOK


 CHARACTER COUNTS

By Aphilas Araia

Buena Vista School

Walnut Creek, CA

June 2011 So far this year, I have learned that it is bad to have or use drugs, also instead of dealing with conflict physically we should deal with it mentally. Character Counts has given me a great experience throughout the year, and I have been inspired to practice all of these great ideas.The kind of character a person is an indication of whether they can make good choices with things that may affect their life. For example, showing responsibility is necessary to resist drug use because this person would have some self control and think before they act. I feel knowing the consequences of drug use, causing disease like cancer, that I can make the right choices. So I hope when I grow older I am able to choose to never start using drugs because I know those consequences and I can show responsibility.

Character Counts gave me more of an experience on how to deal with conflict. Last year I just learned what to do about it besides just walking away. This gave me more information and ideas of how to deal with conflict, like getting an adult or calling the police. I think the character trait of fairness is important and can show how to resolve conflict. If you donÂ’t do anything bad to others they wonÂ’t do anything bad to you. I also think citizenship would show how you would be liked if you cooperate with others and be a good neighbor.

These particular traits will be important for me to try to do in the future. I will keep practicing them so I wonÂ’t become addicted to drugs and so that I will be better resolving conflicts. Note: This year Aphilas AraiaÂ’s instructor was Ms. Kari Stewart. Aphilas can be reached via aphilasaraia@yahoo.com



A book Review of Cultures that We must Preserve and Reject by Ghelawdewos Araia (Institute of Development and Education for Africa, Inc, 2008 
By Teodros Kiros

In no small measure has EthiopiaÂ’ s foremost educational theorist, trained at the prestigious Columbia University, a pioneer of his generation, successfully written a compact but powerful book, that has in its own way given us, Ethiopians, a critical theory of society that is simultaneously transcendence and appropriation. This work is a product of an exilic mind, forced to leave his homeland and seeking to examine the inner architectonic of its rich culture and political tradition with an enviable judiciousness and a measured criticality. Indeed, this work will be appropriated by the future generation as a foundational critical theory of an Ethiopian society, in the grand tradition of the Frankfurt school of critical theory of society.


National Ideologies, National Blinders

Ken Ohashi, World BankÂ’s Country Director for Ethiopia. 
Many nations have a “national ideology” of one kind or another, though it may not be always very explicit. It helps achieve a collective focus on some national goals; it gives individual efforts a shared purpose. So, what is the “national ideology” of Ethiopia? 

I am not entirely sure. Perhaps it has to do with protection of its independence and unique identity; no easy task in a historically fluid and unstable region. More recently, there emerged a narrative around building an economically prosperous and stable nation. However the Ethiopians may describe their own national ideology, it seems to have stressed, as means to achieve its ends, discipline and control. 


The Unconquered Nation, Crippled By Bureaucrats
Jon Evans May 30, 2011
Seems like it’s Sub-Saharan Month around here: first Sarah Lacy went to Nigeria, and now here I am in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital and Africa’s fourth-largest city. It feels like a boomtown. There are cranes and construction sites everywhere, throwing up gleaming new glass-and-steel buildings full of shops selling computers and mobile phones. Alas, Ethiopia’s government seems fond of monopolies, protectionism, and bureaucracy. I believe mobile Internet access is a transformational force that could turn African nations into economic lions to rival Asia’s tigers—but only if it’s fast, cheap, and ubiquitous. And that will never happen here while every bit of Ethiopia’s Internet is controlled by a dinosaur monopoly with no competitive incentive to improve.


Public Agenda (Accra) 
Ghana: We Demand Unqualified Apology From Ethiopia

30 May 2011
Only last Wednesday, May 25, the entire African continent celebrated the 48th birthday of the African Union (AU) with poignant and inspirational messages on the need for African countries to harness their resources and work towards the ultimate goal of building a strong union parallel to that of European Union (EU). In many African countries the day has been declared a public holiday and rightly so, considering the significance of the day in the political history of the continent. Such diplomatic faux pas is counterproductive to the vision of the founding fathers like Dr. Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana and Haile Selassie of Ethiopia as well as the spirit and letter of the AU Charter, as they drive us miles apart. The two leaders, we guess will be turning in their graves over the shameful act of the Ethiopians.


Africa's Future Education Conference
When: 4 September - 6 September 2011
Where: Emperors Palace - Gauteng
The Business Zone is very passionate about the Future of Education in Africa. Skills Development and Education in Africa, as we stand today, is poor and far behind the rest of the world. We need to get the education, training and skills development effort working for the good of those involved - the beneficiaries. Bringing Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to education is vital for the future of Education. We wish to offer a platform to the corporate industry of Africa, as well, donors, education researchers and service providers to discuss trends in education development in Africa.


Venue Rome 
Description GUIDE Association –Global Universities in Distance Education
– is pleased to invite you to the 5th International Conference focusing on current conditions and future trends in the e-learning sector. The Conference will deal with a wide range of issues related to the development of new organization structures and pedagogical models to support complex institutional and university systems, combining education, technology and research. All participants will have the opportunity to take part in the debate concerning the creation of a common quality framework for e-learning system and its different phases: organization, planning, services delivered, monitoring and evaluation, research and development. 
The Conference will approach the following topics:


United States Department of State (Washington, DC) 
Senegal: Solar Technology Powers Learning
Sonya F. Weakley 18 April 2011
Washington — In four middle schools in the Fatick region of Senegal, nylon fabric bound to interlocking pieces of plastic piping is stirring a small revolution in educational philosophy. The materials may seem simple, but that's the point. Combined with a solar-powered battery running a "netbook" computer connected to a small projector and infrared camera, these items are enabling teachers and students to use uncomplicated technology as a tool for 21st-century learning.


EthiopiaÂ’s Challenge is our Challenge

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

May 7, 2011

Great things are achieved by guessing the direction of oneÂ’s century1

Giuseppe Mazzini

While I appreciate Aklog and GetachewÂ’s macroeconomic analysis of Ethiopia and why it “is not conducive” to invest in Ethiopia today (the exact opposite of the GovernmentÂ’s claim of  ‘10 reasons to invest in EthiopiaÂ’), I am of the opinion that the complex Ethiopian scenario requires a more comprehensive political economy analysis.


 

 

My Visit to the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute of African and African American Research at Harvard University

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

April 21 2011

On April 18, 2011 the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research of Harvard 

University honored the quintessential activist and artist Elizabeth Catlett and I went there along with my good friend professor Teodros Kiros to join the spirited and enthused audience that virtually packed the small auditorium in the second floor of the Institute.The event was opened by a brief remark of the charismatic Vira Grant, the Executive Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute and then the Professor and Director of the Institute, Henry Louis Gates, Jr. (popularly known as Skip Gates) arrived and gave a speech on his long-awaited ‘Blacks in Latin America’ PBS series and the biography of Elizabeth Catlett. According to the brochure distributed for the event, “throughout her career, Catlett has been committed to art as a vehicle for social change.


Why the world doesn't care about Djibouti's autocracy. 
BY ALY VERJEE | APRIL 8, 2011 
In the shadow of the extraordinary events under way in the Middle East, Djibouti's presidential vote was always going to struggle for attention. Indeed, the plight of this tiny country, sandwiched between Somalia and Yemen, remains almost completely ignored. But as the primary seaport to 85 million landlocked Ethiopians, the center of anti-piracy efforts in the Horn of Africa, and a reliable Western ally in the war on terror, Djibouti is a strategically vital country in an unstable neighborhood. 

Local consultants aided Khadafy Cambridge firm tried to polish his image
March 04, 2011|Farah Stockman, Globe Staff
CAMBRIDGE — It reads like Libyan government propaganda, extolling the importance of Moammar Khadafy, his theories on democracy, and his “core ideas on individual freedom.’’ But the 22-page proposal for a book on Khadafy was written by Monitor Group, a Cambridge-based consultant firm founded by Harvard professors. The management consulting firm received $250,000 a month from the Libyan government from 2006 to 2008 for a wide range of services, including writing the book proposal, bringing prominent academics to Libya to meet Khadafy “to enhance international appreciation of Libya’’ and trying to generate positive news coverage of the country.


Reform School
In the early days of Ivory Coast's election crisis, U.S. policymakers tried to offer Laurent Gbagbo a post at Boston University. Could academia really entice the world's most entrenched strongmen to step down? 
BY ELIZABETH DICKINSON | APRIL 12, 2011 


Top Khadafy aide helped craft deal with local firm
Company aimed to help Libya image
WASHINGTON — He is Moammar Khadafy’s brother-in-law and his most trusted aide, convicted in absentia for the 1989 bombing of a French airliner and implicated in the 1996 massacre of 1,200 Libyan political prisoners.


IVORY COAST: State of Denial and Denial of Justice

IDEA Viewpoint

Ghelawdewos Araia

April 1, 2011

Ultimately, thus the solution must come from the people of Ivory Coast themselves. Both Quattara and Gbagbo are learned men; the former, by virtue of his banking experience was an International Monetary Fund official, and the latter was a university professor, and they must be able to sit down and talk for the sake of their country and their people. They can share power and form a coalition government, or Gbagbo must be persuaded to exit peacefully and Quattara must show some fortitude to accommodate his erstwhile foe. This is done by sophisticated people who understand the complexity of politics and who also prioritize the security and stability of their country, and above all the welfare of their people. Otherwise, the state of denial in one and the unwillingness of compromise on the other may subsequently deny justice to the people of Ivory Cost for a long period of time. 


Ethiopia crackdown on opposition to prevent protests

afrol News 
Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi is accused of another crackdown on the opposition
afrol News, 19 March - The Ethiopian opposition reports that over 250 of its central members have been arrested during the week. The arrests are seen in connection with a planned mass protest. According to Ethiopia's main opposition coalition Medrek - composed of eight mostly regionally-based parties - several of its member parties have experienced a wave of arrest this week. At least 250 opposition members remain in detention, they claim.


International Intervention & Support to the Libyan Opposition is A Moral Imperative
IDEA Viewpoint March 11, 2011
Ghelawdewos Araia

It is indeed a major dilemma when it comes to the conceptualization and practical application of intervention, but a reasonable assessment of a prevailing political situation could enable us determine whether intervention is worth it vis-à-vis egregious human rights violations. The case of Libya, for instance, demands that intervention is necessary in order rid of a murderous regime, help democratic forces install a government that could respect human rights and serve their interests, and also facilitate peace building and stability in the region.


Africa: Agroecology & the Right to Food
AfricaFocus Bulletin

According to the latest Global Food Price Monitor, from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization, world food prices hit a record high in February, the highest since the index was first created in 1990. The debate on food security, and what to do about, is rising higher and higher on global agendas. There are elements of consensus, such as the need for greater attention to agriculture in development planning, and investment in particular in smallholder agriculture. But there are also significant disagreements on what kind of investment is needed.  In broad terms, one approach is to foster a new "green revolution" giving highest priority to technologies developed in collaboration with large agrifood corporations and assuming compatibility of their interests with those of farmers. The contrasting approach stresses the importance of sustainable agroecology, local knowledge, and participation by smallholder farmers, while noting that large agrifood enterprises and technology they control is more likely to be part of the problem than part of the solution.


Djibouti masses protest U.S./French-backed regime 
By Abayomi Azikiwe 
Editor, Pan-African News Wire 

Published Feb 27, 2011

The former French colony, which still maintains close ties to Paris, has a population of less than 850,000, but serves as a strategic outpost in Western imperialismÂ’s so-called “war on terrorism.” Djibouti houses the only known U.S. military base on the African continent and is therefore highly significant to the PentagonÂ’s strategy aimed at dominating the Horn of Africa, the Gulf of Aden and the Arabian Peninsula. The Financial Times reported that WashingtonÂ’s camp is an outpost for the U.S. Africa Command, Africom. (Feb. 20) 


The USA should cease the moment

By Teodros Kiros

The United States, as one of the founding members of the UN, is no stranger to the concept and practice of collective security. Therefore, the popular uprisings in North Africa should not be viewed as a challenge to the United States; on the contrary, they should be perceived as a golden opportunity for America in finding new democratic friends in Africa and elsewhere. If the United States is serious in reformulating its foreign policy spectrum in such away to accommodate democratic regimes and no longer appease dictators, it should uphold what political scientists call ‘global level of analysis,Â’ in which state and non-state global actors find common ground and work together. 


The Historic North African PeopleÂ’s Uprising and Its Implication for American Foreign Policy

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

February 16, 201

Because the United States employed realism as the basic tenet in its foreign policy for so long, the social reality of other societies that aspire for democracy was largely mystified to the extent that democratic forces in developing nations were either considered not dependable or not trustworthy. America indeed made some modification in its realist policy by embracing the ‘hegemonic stability theory’ paradigm, an admixture of realist and neo-liberal policy, but the latter in fact should have been considered as an important factor in shaping its foreign policy.



Foot Bone Puts Giant Leap for Mankind at 3.2 Million Years Ago
February 10, 2011, 2:04 PM EST
From Businessweek
MannKind Plans to Cut 41% of Workforce on Drug Delays Ethiopia WonÂ’t Need to Fully Liberalize Economy to Join WTO  Sebelius May Not Have Power to Approve Arizona Medicaid Cuts Obama Health-Care Ruling to Get Speedy Appeals Court Review  Pfizer Told to Pay $10 Million Over Prempro Verdict 


The Role of the Diaspora in the Quest for Democratization in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

Paper presented at the SOCEPP Canada Conference, January 15, 2011

The Ethiopian Diaspora nor the home front opposition was successful in its endeavor for the establishment of democracy in Ethiopia, while the EPRDF managed to manipulate and maintain the grips of power to this day. What seems to be the problem? In order to answer this simple question, the Ethiopian Diaspora must openly and candidly discuss the root of the problem, including problems surrounding democratic culture in its own circles. 


THE ECONOMIST - LONDON 
A more hopeful continent 
The lion kings?

Africa is now one of the worldÂ’s fastest-growing regions 

January 6th, 2011

Over the past decade sub-Saharan AfricaÂ’s real GDP growth rate jumped to an annual average of 5.7%, up from only 2.4% over the previous two decades. That beat Latin AmericaÂ’s 3.3%, but not emerging AsiaÂ’s 7.9%. AsiaÂ’s stunning performance largely reflects the vast weight of China and India; most economies saw much slower growth, such as 4% in South Korea and Taiwan.


PUBLIC DISCUSSION ON ETHIOPIA

SOCEPP Canada cordially invites you and your family to a public discussion exploring major issues affecting current day Ethiopia and their implications for democratization and Human Rights. We are fortunate to bring you a team of distinguished and remarkable scholars from the US and Canada , to inform you and engage you on a number of important topics.

Date & Time: Saturday, January 15, 2011, at 4:00PM

Place:      Bronson Centre, 211 Bronson Ave, Ottawa, ON


MENGISTU HAILE MARIAM (EX-PRES.) GETTING AWAY WITH MURDER!(1)
ARE THE UN AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT (ICC) ALIVE?

By Kidane Alemayehu


Horn of Africa Peace Engagement
HOP Referendum on Self-Determination of Southern Sudan
January 7, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Of Devine Warning: Reading Disaster in The Modern Age
Jane Anna Gordon and Lewis R. Gordon

Paradigm Publishers, Boulder & London 2009
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.
January 4, 2011

Of Devine Warning, a small book in terms of length of pages is in fact an encyclopedia of well-synchronized knowledge. The book lays out theoretical frameworks to central questions surrounding monsters, disasters, ruin, and dominant ideologies vs. the oppressed. The strength of the book, however, is not so much in offering conceptual frameworks but in illustrating theoretical and definitional issues by examples. Moreover, apart from the wide-ranging empirical contexts pigeonholed in the various chapters, the book can maximize the potential of generally agreed upon postulates.


Ghana: Oil and The Economy Took Centre Stage
Accra — Someone said the other day that Social Democracy is a political concept that allows discredited communists the opportunity to act as if they have abandoned the principle of communism in favour of a less totalitarian model of government. It is difficult to argue with this definition, given the occurrences in the communist states of Eastern and Central Europe after the cold war. From Russia to Romania, the former communist dictators found solace in Social Democracy when communism collapsed with the end of the colds war.


Ethiopia's Million Dollar Energy Boost
The African Development Bank has provided a loan and grant amounting U.S.$200 Million to support the development of electricity projects, according to state media.
Addis Ababa — The African Development Bank (AfDB) has provided Ethiopia a loan and grant amounting $200 million USD to support the horn nation's projects to develop electricity projects, according to the official Ethiopian Radio and Television Agency (ERTA). The supplementary financing agreement was signed on Monday between Finance and Economic Development Minister, Sufian Ahmed and AfDB resident Representative of Ethiopian Office, Lamin Barrow.


The Horn of Africa Peace Conference
Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D   December 14, 2010

The objective was to generate ideas as much as possible and not necessarily to agree on all issues and this was one of the major accomplishments of the conference. The conference indeed was forum-cum-dialogue par excellence! One shortcoming of the conference perhaps was that the conferees were unable to thoroughly examine the consequences of the formation of a new South Sudan although some were talking about their concerns in informal gatherings. Both the South and North Sudan delegations seemed to have taken it for granted that a South Sudan “Republic” would indeed be formed after January 9, 2010. For all intents and purposes, the Juba new government is a fait accompli given the attitude of the Sudanese delegation and the preparation on the ground in South Sudan. Whatever happens after January 9 in the Sudan, I hope that Sudan will not be embroiled in political skirmishes and conflicts, and I wish the Horn of Africa Peace Conference in Atlanta and beyond would make an input to make peace possible! 


Book Review and Miscellaneous Comments

- Teodros Kiros, Philosophical Essays, Trenton , NJ: The Red Sea Press, 2011, pages 101. $19.95.

- Teodros Kiros, Ethiopian Discourse, Trenton , NJ: The Red Sea Press, 2011, pages 236. $24.95.

     By Tecola Worq Hagos

Professor Teodros Kiros [hereafter “Teodros”] is a well established personality in our Ethiopian Diaspora community (political life) due to his exemplary hard work and commitment to our political and social struggles. In several of his outstanding books, numerous essays and articles, we are privileged to learn about ourselves, about our struggle, and about our hopes and aspirations. Teodros is no charlatan trying his hand in this or that, but a well educated, brilliant, and socially conscious individual. He received his B.A. at University of Wisconsin and his Ph.D. in Political Philosophy at Kent State University . The following two books (under review) are his most recent contribution to our Ethiopian discourse: Teodros Kiros, Philosophical Essays, Trenton , NJ : The Red Sea Press, 2011. [Teodros-1]; Teodros Kiros, Ethiopian Discourse, Trenton , NJ : The Red Sea Press, 2011. [Teodros-2]


Book Review 
Jane Anna Gordon and Lewis R. Gordon, Of Divine Warning; Reading Disaster in the Modern Age (Paradigm Publishers, 2010) Book Review by Teodros Kiros
Jane Gordon and Lewis Gordon have produced a masterpiece on reading disasters in the modern age. The book is at once analytic, historically sensitive and imaginative, feature that we have come to expect from these two committed writers, each time they collaborate and produce books of enduring quality.


The Beautiful Phylicia Rashad 

IDEA Viewpoint

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D   December 2, 2010

 Phylicia Rashad was with Tavis Smiley on November 2, 2010, and she still looks beautiful as when she was acting during the Cosby Show (1984-1992). Like millions of Americans, I used to enjoy the acclaimed show in prime time NBC, a fun-cum-educational TV entertainment in which the gifted grand actor Cosby (Dr. Huxtable) and the many other terrific actors captivated a huge audience. But I was exceptionally attracted to the beauty, elegance, and voluptuous charisma of Phylicia as Ms. Huxtable, a character of a successful attorney and a mom, in the show. However, I must confess that I just explored the brilliance of Phylicia when she appeared on the Tavis Smiley Show. Indeed, I explored a beautiful mind behind a beautiful forehead.


Book Review
Africa: Unity, Sovereignty, and Sorrow. By Pierre Englebert. Boulder,

CO: Lynne Rienner, 2009. 310 pp. $65.00 cloth=$26.50 paper.  This is something of a jubilee year for Africa, marking half a century from that annus mirabilis of 1960 when no fewer than eighteen colonial territories across the continent were given their independence. It might seem churlish, but—aside from literally a handful of truly exceptional cases— one might legitimately ask what there is about these anniversaries that is to be celebrated. By almost any measure of progress or index of well-being, the vast majority of the states of sub-Saharan Africa have failed their citizens.


Ethiopian needs a Spiritual Warrior as a leader

By Teodros Kiros  November 23, 2010 

The spiritual warrior as a leader knows the interiors of pain, the corrosive effects of prejudice and leads by helping the citizens to confront the drone inside and seek spiritual healing Reconciliation, for example, is an attempt at self-purification; it is a very difficult but necessary step at moving forward from frozenness in hate, suspicion and mistrust towards the sunlight of loving the other, who is your other part, the part that non-spiritual warriors have fostered into un enemy. 



Extremism Begets Extremism
By Daniel Gizaw November 19, 2010 

Political commentary, when it is temperate and deliberate, makes sense. However, when it is exorbitant and intemperate, it drives people away. I see the latter as a huge problem. The extremist position is always one-sided. It is also typical with other extremist Diaspora position that had miserably failed. Take a look at the Cuban Diaspora, the Iranian Diaspora, the former Soviet Union Diaspora, or even the Mexican Diaspora of the 1970s. History shows us that all of them share same political passion, same extremist view, with each violently anathematic toward the regimes they opposed in their respective countries. In almost each instances, however, because of their extremist position, they all had missed the opportunity to achieve victory and reclaim “their country.” In this case, Castro is still in Cuba, the Mullahs in Iran have a firm grip on the country’s fate; and, hear this: the demise of the Soviet Union had nothing to do with the dissidents’ movement abroad.


The Fate of Ethiopia Must be Decided by Ethiopians

A commentary on Gregory StantonÂ’s Speech 

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

November 15, 2010  IDEA Viewpoint

This commentary is aimed at the recent speech of Dr. Gregory Stanton to an Ethiopian audience and also at Ethiopians who dearly love their country and who want to make a difference in the future of a better Ethiopia. It is also aimed at Ethiopians who are either unable to fathom the reality of their own society and the complexity of global inputs, or are easily hoodwinked, uncritically accepted divisive ideas, and have applauded to potentially harmful diatribes. 


RECONCILIATION IS THE LANGUAGE OF COMMUNICATIVE RATIIOAALITY 

By Teodros Kiros Ph.D

The decisive advise of Dr. Ghelawdewos must encourage us all to enter into the deep recesses of our rational hearts and invite the prevailing regime to come to the roundtable of dialogue and aim at establishing a concentric circle of themes that we must address to save our nation. I appeal to us Ethiopian to establish forums of national reconciliation globally and invite and encourage Ethiopians to discuss the future of our nation. All views including the viability of armed resistance can and must be freely discussed in the agora of the free market of ideas.


Editoral Observer

Call for pogrom-the verifiable attack of Tigreans by Dr. Gregory Stanton, President of Genocide Watch,

Tigreans could pay the price for Meles crimes – Gregory Stanton

November 12, 2010 

It defies any rationale to justify why Tigreans have to pay the price for the type of government existing in Ethiopia . EPRDF is a coalition composed of many nationalities federated by common interest. It is simply an Ethiopian government recognized by all the world bodies and not as he contemptibly described as a “Tigrean regime”. We don’t understand why Tigreans have to be targeted for such assault campaign and propaganda by this heinous man. This is an archetype and irresponsible person who would like to see and enjoy the killing fields of yet another failed state in the sub region of the Horn of Africa. His scorn and anti-Ethiopian stand cannot lead him anywhere and his call for pogrom of Tigreans is unfortunately not going to be heeded by all our Ethiopian compatriots.


Reconciliation and the Future of Ethiopia
By Teodros Kiros Ph.D

Professor GhelawdewosÂ’ brilliantly crafted National Reconciliation and National Development in Ethiopia is a pragmatic outline of how to bring the existing regime and the opposition to the palaver of a democratic dialogue guided by communicative rationality. This article wisely proposes a model of political behavior worth emulating.


In defense of “National Reconciliation and National Development in Ethiopia"

Bereket Kiros November 7, 2010

I am not trying to stifle criticism and freedom of expression but, rather aimed at writing critically appraise the activities of few individuals who try to make a political career by insulting and name calling. I believe personally in the free flow of ideas that individuals can write articles or essays in defense of their own fundamental rights and their own aspirations at any rate, out of respect I hope my suggestions or criticism will be constructive, and dignified.  Two weeks ago Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD posted an article in various websites titled National Reconciliation and National Development in Ethiopia. The authorÂ’s intention was to open a dialog between the Ethiopian government and the opposition to usher a new beginning and forge a cohesive approach. The authorÂ’s message was lost in the sea of ignorant political discourse. The level of discussion on web is degenerating too low some step must be taken to avoid; itÂ’s becoming another gossip forum. 



Dr. Ghelawdewos AraiaÂ’s Speech Engagement Schedule


National Reconciliation and National Development in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, PhD.

October 22, 2010

The government must preside over a national reconciliation forum not simply with the intention of permitting democratic rights, or sharing power, but also in enabling the opposition to participate in national development at all levels. Politics and development are gregarious, and that is the bottom line that I am implying to when I call upon the opposition and the government to make a historic national reconciliation. Without the participation of the Ethiopian people, development would become ideal chimera of economic salvation, and without reconciling differences of all groups, the Ethiopian nation could not move forward. 


    


Green Revolution for AfricaÂ’s Sustainable Development: Renewed Interest or Paradigm Shift?
Ghelawdewos Araia

October 4, 2010
The concept of green revolution is not nascent to Africa, but African leaders were not able to successfully implement its objectives, nor consistently follow the parameters of the Revolution. When Africans gathered in Ghana on September 4, 2010 to once again talk about the priority of agriculture for development, it is indeed a promising endeavor and initiative by the respective African ministers and the plethora of experts in the field of agriculture.


Ethiopian Muslims Burn Down Christian Homes, Farms
Thursday, September 30, 2010 (2:52 am)
by George Whitten

WASHINGTON, D.C. (Worthy News)-- Twenty-five Muslims burned down ten Christian homes, leaving eighty Christians homeless in Ethiopia, a Washington-based rights' group said Thursday, September 30.
International Christian Concern (ICC) said on July 15 at 8 PM local time, attackers who were led by a local government militia, destroyed the homes in the Goda district of Jimma, Ethiopia. They also set fire to their barns, killing their animals and destroying their harvest. "The assailants asked the Christians to leave their homes and told them, 'We will show you what we are going to do to your homes, and if you inform this to anyone we will burn you the way we burn your homes.' Then they set the Christian homes on fire and began celebrating by singing near the burned homes," ICC quoted a Christian leader, who apparently spoke anonymously due to security concerns.


Westminster Abbey has been accused of sacrilege over its refusal to return a "looted" sacred object to the Ethiopian Orthodox church.
The object is a tabot, a small tablet that symbolises the Ark of the Covenant. Tabots are regarded by 35 million Ethiopian Christians as so sacrosanct that only priests are allowed to look at them. Such is their significance that they must never be displayed or photographed. The abbey has a stone tabot inlaid at the back of an 1870s altar in the Henry VII Lady Chapel, where it is visible to anyone peering around its left side.


Ethiopia: Addis demolishings begin despite lack of compensation funds
Tuesday 21 September 2010 / by Desalegn Sisay
Over 4,500 houses located in different parts of the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa have been earmarked to be demolished this year [2010-2011 fiscal year] under a development plan. The plan will not only affect illegally built houses. For the time being, the city is struggling with compensation payments to owners of legally built structures which will be affected by the plan. Most of the houses set to be dismantled are in shanty areas built on plots which are to undergo re-development. Most are scattered on lands meant for the cityÂ’s main roads, according to the administration charged with the development plan.


A Young Ethiopian Reconnecting with Her Roots in the Motherland

September 4, 2010

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

Samrawit is one of the many Ethiopians who traveled from North America, Europe, Asia, and Australia to the motherland; and this Diaspora young Ethiopians, as a matter of course, encounter cross-cultural and comparative perception of two cultures, namely the Ethiopian and the Diasporan. For Samrawit, more specifically, it was an exposure to the cultural uniqueness and ethos of Ashenda, but it was also an opportunity for her to reconnect herself with her roots and begin to appreciate her cultural heritage. All culture is learned and there is no such thing as genetic imprint of culture. The oft-expression of ‘our culture is in our blood’ is egregiously unscientific. Samrawit, like all other girls, thus, was initiated in the Ashenda festival and learned some aspect of her cultural heritage.

 


Energy and Security Issues in the Red Sea Transforming as the Age of Gas Begins in Earnest
Written by Gregory R. Copley 

Thursday, 26 August 2010 13:56 
Major new energy issues are about to transform still further the strategic balance of the Horn of Africa and the Red Sea, with foreseeable consequences for the global energy market over the coming decade. Soon-to-be-evident new wealth in the Red Sea/Horn of Africa region will transform the intensity of conflict there, which in turn will affect not only the region, but the worldÂ’s most important trading route: the Red Sea/Suez sea line of communication (SLOC).


Ethiopia Must Complete the Construction of Gilgel Gibe III Dam
IDEA Editorial
August 30, 2010
Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

Ethiopians in the Diaspora who have entertained ideas opposing the Gilgel Gibe project too must rethink there stands and carefully delineate the distinction between a seating regime and the long-term development of Ethiopia. In the meantime, the government must bolster its initiative in an effort to expedite the construction of the dam and must seek alternative avenues, including capital and technical assistance from any government that would support the Gilgel Gibe III project.


Unequal Playing Field Becomes Breeding Ground for Corruption 

TESFAYE KIDAN (PhD) (tesfayekidan@gmail.com),

It is a matter of time before the technocrats there perfect the mechanisms to manage their shady deals without detection; there is a credible risk that the commission may turn out to be a perfect breeding place for corruption. Given societyÂ’s negative perception of corruption, these interventions by the administration, if well managed, could cut the incentives for corruption significantly. However, to the extent that such interventions are delayed, and as corruption becomes common, Ethiopian society may lose its distaste for it. Once corruption is deep-rooted in society, it would be very difficult, if not impossible, to reverse participation in it. 


Constructing Shrines of all Faiths at Ground Zero: An Alternative Idea

IDEA Viewpoint

August 16, 2010

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D.

There is no doubt that the idea of constructing a mosque near Ground Zero, which by most Americans is considered a hallow ground, has stirred controversy among the public. The opinions debated on the mosque idea by proponents and opponents are understandable, but unfortunately people on either side tend to dichotomize the issues pertaining to the mosque vis-à-vis Ground Zero. They don’t see a middle ground in the extremities of the continuum and we are all lost in the blazing arguments and counter-arguments. Therefore, this IDEA viewpoint offers an alternative idea, indeed a novel solution, of constructing shrines of all faiths at Ground Zero.


Tool-making and meat-eating began 3.5 million years agoBy Jason Palmer
Science and technology reporter, BBC News

Researchers have found evidence that hominins - early human ancestors - used stone tools to cleave meat from animal bones more than 3.2 million years ago. That pushes back the earliest known tool use and meat-eating in such hominins by more than 800,000 years. Bones found in Ethiopia show cuts from stone and indications that the bones were forcibly broken to remove marrow. The research, in the journal Nature, challenges several notions about our ancestors' behaviour.



Ethiopian Opposition Alliance Takes Step Toward Becoming a Single Party 

A coalition of Ethiopian opposition parties will take steps toward becoming a single party by forming a front, said Negasso Gidada, co-deputy chairman of the so-called Medrek alliance.


African Union
(Addis Ababa)

The African Capacity Building Foundation and the African Union Sign Memorandum of Understanding in the Margins of the AU Summit in Kampala

Uganda — Strategic partnership between the African Capacity Building Foundation and the African Union to harness joint resources for a better Africa
The African Capacity Building Foundation (ACBF) and the African Union (AU) today signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to cement their strategic partnership. H.E. Mr. Jean Ping, Chairperson of the African Union Commission signed on behalf of the AU and Dr. Frannie Léautier Executive Secretary on behalf of ACBF.


IDEA Hails The East African Common Market

IDEA Editorial

July 10, 2010

July 1, 2010 marks the official establishment of the East African Common Market Protocol, whose members are Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, and Burundi. It is a historic achievement for the Eastern African Bloc in particular and Africa in general, for this regional cooperation means a higher level of civil, economic, cultural, and political agenda that will altogether benefit 125 million people with a GDP of at least $70 billion.


Unearthed, the ancient texts that tell story of Christianity 
A British bookbinder has restored ancient copies of the gospels dating back to the fourth century, writes Jerome Taylor
A still colourful page from the book despite the 1600 age of the worlds oldest christian book found in a remote monastry in Ethiopia. The text was thought to be medieval but carbon dating has taken it back to the 5th century AD. 
Originally thought to be from around the 11th century, new carbon dating techniques place the Garima Gospels between 330 and 650 AD. New dating techniques have put the creation of the two books to somewhere between 330 and 650, making them a close contender to being the most ancient complete Christian texts. The only major collection of scripture that is known to be older is the Codex Sinaiticus, a copy of the Bible hand-written in Greek which dates back to the third century. Unlike the Garima Gospels, the Codex includes large chunks of the Old Testament, but the entire work is divided between museums and monasteries in Egypt, Britain, Russia and the USA. 


  


Towards Poverty Alleviation and Greater Inclusiveness in AfricaÂ’s Middle Income Countries?

Poverty reduction strategies in Africa can be improved by understanding the sources of 

Audrey Verdier-Chouchane

economic growth and how such growth translates into poverty reduction. Using different household survey data at 5 to 10-year intervals, the AfDBÂ’s Research Department conducted a pro-poor growth analysis in four of AfricaÂ’s middle-income countries (MICs): Mauritius, Morocco, South Africa and Tunisia. While all four countries are shown to have moved from agro-based primary sector economies, with manufacturing, services, exports and tourism becoming increasingly important, significant differences emerge in terms of the poverty-reducing effects of the observed growth.


Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia on African Television Network: Perspectives on The Ethiopian Election 2010' on the above link:


Looking Back and Looking Forward: Beyond the Politics of Ethiopian Election 2010
Ghelawdewos Araia      June 3, 2010

Ethiopians have no choice but to look back and look forward. The opposition, in particular, must reevaluate its political program in light of the objective conditions of Ethiopia and reassess its tactics and strategies. The opposition also must win the hearts and minds of the US and the EU despite the latterÂ’s cynical role in global politics. The Ethiopian opposition must understand that the US and the EU have now hegemonic control and it must recalibrate its performance in relation to the foreign powersÂ’ international status and the dialectical engagement with world histories and global processes.


The saga of the Starbucks-Ethiopia affair
By Wondwossen Mezlekia
May 31, 2010
The coffee trademark dispute between Starbucks and Ethiopia officially ended exactly three years ago. In June 2007, the giant coffee chain and the government of Ethiopia declared their agreement "to work together to license, distribute and market EthiopiaÂ’s specialty coffees." Starbucks further promised, as part of the dispute resolution, to buy its aprons from textile factories in Ethiopia, open a Farmer Support Center in Addis Ababa, and promote the coffee brands in its stores. Listen to this article. Powered by Odiogo.com


Medrek Support Group North America (MSGNA)

The Shamefaced Ruling Party & the Phony 2010 Ethiopian Election

May 26, 2010

The 2010 election is yet another sign of a direct confrontation of the EPRDF with the Ethiopian people and the ruling party have to answer to the people for all the violence it unleashed when the people, on the contrary, sought peaceful political change through free and fair elections. But the arrogant Meles regime would not listen. Sooner or later, the Ethiopian people will rise and bring the criminal gang of the EPRDF before the court of justice, a newly established institution out of the blood and tears of the Ethiopian people.


EU chief observer says Ethiopian poll was not fair 
By ANITA POWELL Associated Press Write

Ask AP: Immigration bills, sucking up spilled oil 
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) -- Tens of thousands of ruling party supporters rallied Tuesday in Ethiopia's capital to celebrate victory in the national election, while the chief EU observer said the poll had been marred by an uneven playing field. A top opposition leader denounced the provisional results released by the Ethiopian elections board, but did not indicate what action his party would take. Prime Minister Meles Zenawi arrived midmorning at the main square in Addis Ababa and addressed the crowd as hundreds of blue-uniformed federal police stood guard.


The Next struggle for Hegemony: Political calmness in the middle of a storm.
By Teodros Kiros

“If the EPRDF acts in the same manner as it did during the 2005 election and grabs power by force, it should not be a shocking revelation, for it has become standard practice in EPRDF’s operations to stifle any democratic process that is perceived as threat to the status quo. The Ethiopian people knew too well about this kind of scenario and it is no longer a mystique obscurity. But they could be scared of government forces including the intimidating cadres, the police, the secret service, and the military forces.”


Why Ethiopians Must Support Medrek and Aspire for A Democratic and Peaceful Transition

Ghelawdewos Araia May 17, 2010

Is this what we get from the EPRDF in the last two decades? Does the EPRDF at all have a positive façade? Let me begin with the latter and galvanize the central theme of this paper. I have always argued that objectivity and integrity are two faces of the same coin. If I claim I have integrity, I would be remiss if I fail to mention EPRDF’s achievements. All hitherto governments of Ethiopia had merit and demerit and even the murderous Derg government had initiated some major development projects like the Melka Wekena Hydroelectric, the Shiwushu-Gumaro tea plantation, the Bahir Dar and Komblecha textile industries, the Beles agricultural project, the Muger cement factory, and Gilgel-Ghibe Hydroelectric. The latter is now being expanded under the EPRDF.


Medrek Support Group North America (MSGNA)

May 13, 2010

It is for the first time in the last two decades that a cohesive and well-organized coalition of eight parties led by visionary and dedicated leaders that has really challenged and confronted the EPRDF. In the 2005 election, the Unity for Democracy and Justice (UDJ) or Kinijit was a relatively viable opposition but its non-democratic operations coupled by very loose organizational network and inside job saboteurs, made it an easy target to the more formidable EPRDF. The latter had already knew about the weaknesses of UDJ and despite the overwhelming success of Kinijit on the polls, especially in the urban areas, the ruling party, by claiming that it had won the rural areas, snatched the ballots by sheer force. Then UDJ supporters protested by staging demonstrations and they were dealt with government bullets and bayonets.


OPPOSITION CAMP ON ECONOMY
With Temesgen Zewdie, (MEDREK)

TEMESGEN ZEWDIE (Medrek)

Q. To what extent should the involvement of state in the management of the economy go? 
The factors of production like land, capital, labour, and entrepreneurship are all sources of wealth. These will be controlled by the private sector. 
In a country where the major source of capital - which is land - is controlled by the government, farmers consider themselves as employees of the state. Not only does the government control the land, now it even controls what crops are harvested and where they are supposed to be collected. 
The major player in both sectors, owning the land and the crops on the land, is the government. The ruling party has its own trade conglomerates that control the fertilizer of the land and the farmer plays no role becoming a political instrument for the ruling party. 


In Defence of Participatory Democracy and against
Revolutionary Democracy and Liberal Democracy:

9 May, 2010 | By Teodros Kiros (Ph.D)

Ethiopia needs participatory democracy, as the politicalform of its immediate future, a
future that is simultaneously an ideal and a strategy, which needs the participation of the Ethiopian people, so as to bring about the desperately needed alternative to the sham democracy of the ruling regime.


World Bank (Washington, DC)

Sierra Leone: Supporting our Global Common Interests

Samura Kamara 5 May 2010

column

With the strong support of the international development community, Sierra Leone is emerging from a legacy of conflict which has delayed hopes for a better future for millions of our people.

Our country is beginning to move beyond humanitarian and emergency relief, focusing instead on more lasting investments in the future of our nation, gains in building strong democratic institutions, restored economic stability and more accountable, responsible and stable leadership.A common factor in this progress for us, and for many other low-income countries, has been the support of the International Development Association (IDA), the World Bank Group's concessional arm, which provides lending and grants for the world's poorest countries. IDA works with us as a partner to provide financial resources, technical assistance and effective collaboration with other development partners, to support our economic development priorities and help build institutions to sustain growth and provide clear results that benefit our people.


Dark Horses in Ethiopian Politics

IDEA Viewpot

April 30, 2010

Ghelawdewos Araia

While the ruling EPRDF party is attempting to reverse the role of history in Ethiopia, Mesfin as a dark horse is collaborating with his incarcerators against his former Andinet comrades. Whether his actions are witting or not, his role (along with the plethora other dark horses) would certainly contribute to the GovernmentÂ’s success in promoting propaganda against the opposition. The dark horsesÂ’ flagrantly counter productive actions also would result in the disempowering function of diluting the upcoming election. More so, the dark horses would bring unforeseen bonus to the government in power by serving as distraction from the more pressing problems confronting Ethiopia.


The Medrek Genius: The Metaphors of the Mule, the Surrogate Mother, and the Hut

April 21, 2010    Ghelawdewos Araia

I like to make a momentÂ’s reflection on the intricacy and complexity of politics that, in one form or another, evolves independent of our will. The Medrek coalition must seriously consider the possibility of shadowy figures that camouflage as friends but who could foster damage. These elements are a lot dangerous than the present government in power. They could be intellectually superior but they are morally retarded. Here, I am neither constructing a rational analysis nor providing a suggestive model to Medrek, but merely venting my concerns.


Pointers of Justice and the Ongoing Debates in Ethiopia

Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D

April 10, 2010

Ancient Ethiopian history is replete with governance equated with justice. Contemporary Ethiopia (especially under the rule of the Derg and the EPRDF), on the other hand, is racked by sever injustice and human rights violations. What we have now is cutthroat competition to wield state power at any coast. In fact, there is a tremendous obsession of power among Ethiopians and the wish to control the state machinery.



Symposium on Current Ethiopian Issues 
The joint Committee consisting of the Ethiopian Unity Diaspora Forum (EUDF), the United Ethiopian Democratic Forces (UEDF), the Ethiopian Peoples Revolutionary Party (EPRP – D), extends its invitation to all Ethiopians in the Diaspora and Friends of Ethiopia to the Symposium on Ethiopian Current Issues, of March 27, 2010 to be held at Meriden Hill Hall, Howard University. 


Background to the Emergence of Dictatorship in Ethiopia

Kaleb Gebremeskel

March 12, 2010

Given the brutality and intolerance of Meles and his party, the 2010 election, like the 2005 election before it, may end up in the bloody attack of the opposition by police forces. But if things go well and a relatively civil electoral process is conducted, Medrek may not capture state power but it would definitely secure sizable seats in the parliament and could enjoy legitimacy as the main opposition in the legislature.


Medrek is the Future of Ethiopia.
By Teodros Kiros (Ph.D)

For years many Ethiopians and I have been asking the perennial  question, Which Way Ethiopia? This question has engaged the Ethiopian imagination, ever since EPRDF betrayed its revolutionary genealogy and  became relentlessly tyrannical, unwilling to listen to the pulse of the Ethiopian people, arrogantly dismissive of its intellectuals, and  incarcentrating the voices of dissidents, most notably the hero of justice, Birtukan Mideksa.


The Horn of Africa Deconstructing Ideologies & Reconstructing Political Systems
Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D. 

Scholars, analysts, and policy makers must carefully diagnose the complex socio-economic and political parameters of the Horn countries individually and/or collectively. Then, they must come up with prognosis (permanent solutions to the problems) of respective countries or the Horn of Africa as a whole. For effective and meaningful investigation of the Horn crisis and suggested solutions, thus, it is proposed that the new leaders incorporate deconstructing ideologies and reconstructing political systems into the corpus of their policies.  


Medrek Support Group North America (MSGNA)
February 22, 2010

Our country Ethiopia is rich not only in its glorious history and civilization, but also in its tradition of maintaining its independence for so long, thanks to its patriotic children who unflinchingly defended its sovereignty and territorial integrity. While the EPRDF regime, more than often, has attempted to erode Ethiopia’s sovereignty by compromising its territorial integrity through un-mandated conventions such as the Algiers Agreement and the secret negotiations between Sudan and the Ethiopian Government on “border demarcation” and subsequent loss of Ethiopian land, the main opposition Medrek consistently and steadfastly advocated for Ethiopia’s territorial integrity, including its right for an outlet to the sea. Medrek struggles to continue the legacy of Ethiopian patriots.


EU Considers Observing Ethiopia Election as Campaign Heats Up

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa

A European Union exploratory team is visiting Ethiopia to determine whether to send an observer mission to monitor national elections in May. The election campaign has taken a negative turn amid questions about whether the vote would be fair. A series of televised debates opened last week with a furious exchange among parties vying for seats in Ethiopia's parliament. The ruling Ethiopian People's Revolutionary Democratic Front dominated the airtime, taking 67 minutes of the three-hour broadcast. Other parties were limited to 22 minutes each.


Zimbabwe: Demystifying "Sanctions"

AfricaFocus Bulletin

Feb 16, 2010 (100216)

(Reposted from sources cited below)

The European Union formally decided on February 15 to lift restrictive measures against 6 individuals and 9 companies in Zimbabwe that were previously subject to travel bans and asset freezes, but continued the measures for another year on the majority of the 203 individuals and 40 companies on the list. The EU cited the lack of progress in implementation of the Global Political Agreement of September 2008 as the reason for continued measures. Companies removed included the Industrial Development Corporation of Zimbabwe and the Zimbabwe Iron and Steel Company


Beneath the LionÂ’s Gaze Maaza Mengiste
W.W.Norton & CompanyNew York London 2010
Reviewed by Ghelawdewos Araia, Ph.D. 
February 1, 2010

Maaza Mengiste has masterfully delineated the foundation of a new political history of Ethiopia in fiction. On top of its richness in image, tone, diction, paradox, symbol, metaphor, characterization, and narrative technique, Beneath the LionÂ’s Gaze is destined to inform the present readers by systematically recapturing the Ethiopian political landscape of the 1970s and beyond. It is reminiscence par excellence. The BookÂ’s contribution to EthiopiaÂ’s cultural regeneration and literary renaissance is quite apparent, and I recommend it very highly.


Feadback to the editoral January 26, 2010

Dear brothers in IDEA, this is not a simple problem and you African intellectuals have a moral responsibility to defend the African people by raising your voices. This does not require fighting with individual African states. You all can have a forum of African intellectuals where you all can discuss African issues and work and support the African Union to make it stronger so that the Union deal with problems and defend the continent. This communication only requires you to have a web page. 


January 26, 2010

Letter to the editor:

It seems to me there are two major concerns in relation to the establishment of Africom: 1) Africa would become a chessboard between major powers (say the U. S. and China) as during the Cold War; 2) the majority of African leaders, excepting some, may acquiesce to the U. S. demand in spite of the negative impact Africom could have on the continent. In the long run, as the IDEA editorial rightly put it, the ContinentÂ’s depends on foreign powers will continue and its development agenda will be systematically arrested as during the colonial and post-colonial periods. History may repeat itself unless and until Africans determine their own fate and I am not sure whether that is feasible and reality is in favor of Africans.


The United States African Command: Meanings for Africa!

IDEA editorial

1/13/2010

If African countries endorse AfricomÂ’s mission and objectives, the respective leaders individually or collectively through the African Union (AU) must have wittingly accepted technical dependence on the United States. It is safely assumed that the U. S. is not going to act like an imperialist occupying force in the old colonial strategic sense, but it will definitely have a major clout on African countries domestic and foreign policies. African states that welcome the physical presence of Africom on Africa must have anticipated that a part of their sovereignty will be compromised.


How Christian Ethiopia (Abyssinia) saved Islam 
By Kamran Pasha | December 26, 2009 

Debre-Libanos MonasteryFor me as a Muslim, this story of how Christians and Muslims could get past theology and see the truth in each other's hearts is one of the most beautiful tales to unite our communities as we struggle to define faith in the 21st century. And like the story of Christmas itself, I believe that the tale of the Christian king and the Muslim refugees is not just a memory of a time long past. It is, I hope, a vision of a world still to come. A world that will be built by sincere people of faith, who care more about love for humanity than about the triumph of their own tribe or theology. It is, God-willing, a prophecy.
On behalf of your Muslim brothers and sisters, I wish you all a joyous Christmas


 


 


Birtukuan, Tell Me!

Ghelawdewos Araia  

What have you done my dear

To be thrown into the jail of Qaliti

Is it your elegant appearance?

Or your formidable political stance

Is it your political consciousness?


Brief Chronology of Ethiopian History

Edited and compiled by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia

December 7, 2009

Ethiopia is one of the ancient countries in the world with a rich history and continuity of intellectual and material culture of antiquity. The beginnings of Ethiopian civilization goes back to a thousand years before the birth of Christ, but it was in the first seven centuries AD, i.e. when Aksum arose, that a spectacular civilization took place in Ethiopia. Here, we will just put a brief chronology of Ethiopian history and some recommendations for our subscribers in an effort to introduce them to historians, scholars, and other authors on Ethiopian history.


Africa: Ending Malaria in Sight? 
AfricaFocus Bulletin
Nov 27, 2009 (091127)
(Reposted from sources cited below) 
Editor's Note 
On the Comoran island of Moheli, with a population of 36,000, malaria has been eliminated with the aid of a comprehensive Chinese-assisted treatment campaign. And at the 5th Pan-African malaria conference, held in Nairobi in early November, Kenya's minister of public health, Beth Mugo, announced that her country had set the goal of eliminating the disease by 2017. 


Farmer Geda Shenu, who lives in a drought-hit rural area near the town of Meki, Ethiopia, is struggling to feed his children and has petitioned for government assistance. The Ethiopian government has restricted coverage of the drought and is hampering the work of international aid groups.

Geoffrey YorkEthiopia: Land of silence and starvation

Farmer Geda Shenu, who lives in a drought-hit rural area near the town of Meki, Ethiopia, is struggling to feed his children and has petitioned for government assistance. The Ethiopian government has restricted coverage of the drought and is hampering the work of international aid groups. A famine is growing across Ethiopia, but the government is clamping down on information - even ejecting aid agencies that could help bring aid for fear of provoking unrest and losing their grip on power


 


The United States Should End Supporting Dictatorship in Ethiopia

IDEA Viewpoint     October 19, 2009

At the outset we like to make clear to our readers that we at IDEA have no intention whatsoever to belittle initiatives taken by the Ethiopian government. We are neither interested nor have the time for character assassination, but we are steadfast in uncovering the reality in Ethiopia, as we have done in the past by series of editorials and articles.The United States must also realize that the global political scenario has dramatically changed over the last two decades in favor of democracy and the market economy. There shouldn’t be any justification for U. S. policy makers to embrace anti-people and anti-democratic regimes, as it was the case, for instance, during the entire period of the ‘60s, ‘70s, 80s and beyond.


 


Africa: Global Fund for Education
Africa Focus Bulletin Sep 21, 2009

"A Global Fund for Education holds the key to delivering on the 
world's commitment to education for all by 2015. Evolving current 
mechanisms into a more independent, inclusive, and accountable 
institution can catalyze the resources and performance needed to 
achieve universal education. [Because of the strong effects of 
education on other development goals] this would make a major 
contribution to reducing global poverty, empowering women, and 
promoting economic growth in low-income countries around the world." - 
Center for Universal Education


'Violent Eruption' Brewing May Spill Into EA 
Kevin J. Kelley 14 September 2009

"Paranoia" on the part of the former guerrilla fighters who now lead the country is cited as an impediment to a democratic system. The ruling party's "obsession with controlling political processes from the federal to the local level" is inciting opposition groups to consider taking up arms, the Brussels-based International Crisis Group says.

"Without genuine multiparty democracy," the report suggests, "the tensions and pressures in Ethiopia's polities will only grow, greatly increasing the possibility of a violent eruption that would destabilise the country and region."


OUR TEDDY IS GONE: America has Lost Its Best Son!

IDEA Editorial

August 26, 2009

If life indeed is ‘purpose driven’, Teddy Kennedy is its quintessential manifestation. Since his election to the US Senate in 1962, Teddy Kennedy proved to the world that he was the torchbearer of the mission of his brothers, Joseph, John, and Robert. Throughout his eight-term period in the Senate, he relentlessly proposed and wrote progressive legislations and courageously fought for their fruition and conversion into laws.

 


Ethiopians Owe a Lot to African Americans

IDEA Editorial

August 24, 2009

The recent Aiga Forum derogatory remark against President ObamaÂ’s Administration, though infuriating and enraging, is not at all surprising. In fact, it clearly manifests the true nature and unspoken embodiment of the backward mentality, akin to medieval or antediluvian psychological make-up, of the editors of Aiga Forum. Apparently, the Aiga group felt ignored because the Honorable Hilary Clinton, Secretary of State, did not visit Ethiopia during her extensive African tour. And they vented their anger in the following:


Egged bus driver to Ethiopian: No blacks allowed

Woman recounts humiliating experience in which bus driver told her, 'Kushit, in Ethiopia you didn't even have shoes and here you do, so why donÂ’t you walk?'; Egged to investigate incident. Daniel Edelson Published: 08.11.09, 22:20 / Israel News


How Henry Louis Gates Got Ordained as the Nation's "Leading Black Intellectual"
Post-Race Scholar Yells Racism
By ISHMAEL REED

Gates has discussed doing a documentary about racial profiling. I invite him to cover a meeting residents of my Oakland ghetto neighborhood have with the police each month. (Most of our problems incidentally are caused by the off-springs of  two family households. Suburban gun dealers who arm gang leaders. The gang leader on our block isnÂ’t black! An absentee landlord who owns a house where crack operations take place.) He can bring Bill Cosby with him.


ObamaÂ’s Vision for Africa is Short of Substantive Vision

IDEA Editorial

July 13, 2009

Some of the most important points Obama raised in his speech are, “no nation will create wealth if its leaders exploit the economy”; “Africa does not need strong men but strong institutions”; “development depends on good governance” etc. We agree with Obama that good governance or a committed and visionary leadership will ultimately play a crucial role in the transformation of the Continent. Sometime in the early 1980s, the famous Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe said, “the Nigerian problem is the unwillingness or inability of its leaders to rise to the responsibility, to the challenge of personal example which are the hallmarks of true leadership.”



SOUTHERN AFRICAN REGIONAL UNIVERSITIES ASSOCIATION (SARUA)

 


Democracy, the Ruling Party, and Opposition Mobilization in Ethiopia
Ghelawdewos  Araia   June 1, 2009

Can the Ethiopian political parties mobilize the opposition and enable it to articulate its aggregate preferences? Is there a political climate conducive enough to permit the opposition to meet its goals and objectives? Is the Ethiopian opposition equipped enough in organizational capability (party structure, membership drive, departmental task forces, finances etc.) and theoretical constructs (vision and political clarity)? These are some of the questions pertaining to the realities on the ground in Ethiopia that the opposition must address and answer before it ventures into the 2010 elections.


Africa: More Political Freedom Brings More Wealth, Says Study

25 May 2009

African nations which expand their political freedoms also reduce poverty, according to a major new study published today. In a survey of selected countries across the continent, the study also finds that between 2000 and 2008, poverty decreased in Cape Verde, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa and Zambia but grew in Benin, Botswana, Madagascar, Nigeria, Senegal and Zimbabwe.


Africa: Forty-Six Years on, Continent Can Be Optimistic About the Future
Stephen Asiimwe 24 May 2009

Kampala — Today, May 25, is the African Liberation Day. I congratulate all Africans on the continent and in the diaspora for celebrating this historical moment.
The day honours the 1963 signing of the charter establishing the Organisation of the African Unity (OAU), now African Union (AU). It pledges solidarity for the liberation of Africa. The OAU was criticised for not living up to the mandate of uniting Africa and responding to its various challenges. Many of the criticisms were understandable though not all of them were deserved.


INTERVIEW-Ethiopia opposition says anti-govt plot invented

By Barry Malone- ADDIS ABABA, May 5 (Reuters) - An Ethiopian opposition leader said on Tuesday an anti-government plot had been invented as an excuse to arrest potential candidates ahead of national elections next year. "Without third party verification I can't believe there was a plot," Bulcha Demeksa, leader of one of the largest opposition parties, the Oromo Federalist Democratic Movement, told Reuters. "This government is just looking for an excuse to imprison potential politicians." Prime Minister Meles Zenawi's government said last month a group led by an Ethiopian-American professor had planned to use assassinations and bombings to provoke street protests and topple the government


Ethiopia: 'To Be? Or Not to Be?', Meles Undecided Over Next PM Post

Yonas Abiye 14 April 2009

Addis Abeba — The question of whether Prime Minister Meles Zenawi would continue to assume his position as Prime Minister of Africa's second most populated country may be what every one wants to know as the country approaches next general elections.  But that has remained to be a conundrum, prompting more curiosity among his followers, and opponents alike. In a number of interviews with local and foreign media, Meles has spoken about the matter -only in a rather obscure way, giving way to more suspicions and speculation. His reticence about the matter has put people in darkness as far his fate as Prime Minister and EPRDF, as ruling party, is concerned.


Africa Must Be Left Alone Without Donor Aid

IDEA Editorial

April 3, 2009

The negative impact of donor aid in Africa is engendered by external (Northern) governments, institutions, and NGOs as well as internal African problems triggered by bad governance. For the most part, northern prescriptions for AfricaÂ’s problems were wrong and ignominious failures. Adding insult to injury, the majority of African leaders were corrupt and miserably incapacitated, and far from implementing sound economic projects and sustainable development programs, they have played counterproductive roles in their respective nations.


OBAMA AND ETHIOPIA, 5: TIME FOR FRESH THOUGHT, NEW DEPARTURES?
Donald N. Levine,  University of Chicago 
Promoting energy independence, resource management, and environmental restoration President Obama mentioned energy independence as the highest priority of his administration. In Ethiopia, leapfrogging over costly, wasteful, and environmentally harmful practices of the industrial age can be realized right now through green technologies. The U.S. is at the edge of efforts to rethink its ways of procuring energy, efforts necessitated by a combination of security, environmental, and economic exigencies. Available new technologies, with other innovations in tow, would create stunning socioeconomic results in Ethiopia. 

Ethiopian Unity Diaspora Forum Conference

February 28, 2009 Columbus , Ohio

“Unity, Hope and Vision: Ethiopia Yesterday and Today and Tomorrow

PRESS RELEASE:

The Ethiopian Unity Diaspora Forum held its first organizational Conference in Columbus , Ohio on February 28, 2009. Despite their diverse backgrounds, the Participants displayed one common passion—the shared love of the Motherland. The preservation and maintenance of the Sovereignty and territorial integrity of Ethiopia was without question the unifying factor that beckoned the Participants to meet at the first organizational conference of the EUDF. Some of the participants drove hundreds of miles, and all Participants financed their own travel and lodging to participate in this historic Conference.



Professor Richard Pankhurst    February 22, 2009
Few foreigners, if any, can proudly talk about their impact on Ethiopia, her freedom and her international presence, as the Pankhurst family did. Madam Sylvia Pankhurst, Professor Richard PankhurstÂ’s mother, born in 1882 in Manchester to Dr. Richard Pankhurst and Emmeline Pankhurst, founded a newspaper (New Times and Ethiopia News) in England in 1936, which became the only mouthpiece for the war-torn Ethiopia against her bitter battle with the Italian fascists. At the time, when it was actually uncustomary to oppose the juggernaut fascists, the young Sylvia Pankhurst, conscious of the suffering of millions of Ethiopians, refused to back down even when seasoned politicians (who felt alliance with Mussolini was worth than any association with Emperor Haile Selassie) in England pleaded with her to discontinue her protest. 


Africa: Experts - African Economies to Grow Despite Global Crisis
Simon Kolawole
30 January 2009

Davos, Switzerland — Although the continent is not insulated from the global financial crisis, African countries will perform "relatively better" than other regions of the world this year.
This was the consensus among discussants at the session on Africa at the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting holding in Davos, Switzerland. Also, the Chairman and Editor-in-Chief of THISDAY Newspapers, Mr. Nduka Obaigbena, has made a strong case for more investments in Africa. The tempered optimism on Africa's growth in 2009 is fuelled by the fact that its capital markets are not integrated globally, except for South Africa, thereby limiting the effects of the crisis on Africa.
However, it was projected that some 3.5 percentage points may be shaved off the continent's GDP growth this year, with serious problems already obvious as seen in the closure of numerous mines in Zambia.


Barack Obama, A Man of the People

IDEA Editorial January 22, 2009

What makes Obama the real man of the people, long before he climbed the mountaintop, that he was a community organizer first. In fact, when he danced in the Neighborhood Mall on January 20th, he symbolically represented the community-organizer turned senator turned president that is a commoner, a citizen, and a man of the people.


ItÂ’s a triumph for Africa
Posted Wednesday, January 7 2009 at 19:12

GhanaÂ’s new President, Mr John Evans Atta Mills, was sworn in on Wednesday in a ceremony that gave Africa a reason for celebration. He won a razor-thin mandate, squeezing just slightly over 50 per cent of the vote to beat his sole challenger in the run-off poll, Mr Nana Akufo-Addo of the former ruling New Patriotic Party.The thin margin would have given justification for protracted post-election strife, but the people and leadership of Ghana thought differently and gave a peaceful transition a chance.





United States Foreign Policy and Why Africa Matters Now 
Ghelawdewos Araia-   December 18, 2008

While Liberals view human nature as essentially good, Realists cynically consider human beings as inherently selfish, depraved, and flawed. While liberals heavily depend on the paradigm of reason and universal ethics in international relations, Realists emphasize national survival and hence national interest predicated on a relatively hostile and chaotic global order. Based on these rival theoretical doctrines (perceptions rather), thus, American foreign policy was reconfigured and reformed many times, but was unable to absorb or adopt the European legacy of social democracy or the Kantian concept of universal brotherhood.


Catholic Information Service for Africa (Nairobi) 
Somalia: Rare Achievement As 20 Young Doctors Graduate

Twenty young men and women have accomplished something that nobody in Somalia has done in nearly two decades of state failure: They graduated from medical school.
The graduation ceremony for 12 men and eight women was held on Thursday inside the barricaded walls of the Shamo Hotel in Mogadishu, the bullet-scarred capital of a country that has not had an effective central government since 1991. "The graduation of these students shows something that nobody outside Somalia can believe ­ that students can still learn despite violence and anarchy," said Mohamed Malim Muse, president of Mogadishu's Benadir University, according to the Associated Press.


Ethiopia: India Private Investment Reaches $4 billion

Fikremariam Tesfaye  Addis Abeba

India today is becoming the single largest foreign investor in Ethiopia with nearly $4 billion in private sector investment, said the Ambassador on Monday. Gurjit Singh, Ambassador of India, on his presentation under the title of "India's role in Ethiopia economy with emphasis on infrastructure sector" said, floriculture and agriculture, mining, manufacturing and services are the main areas of his country's investment here


AfDB Approves 10th Drinking Water Supply Project in Morocco

Tunis

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has approved US$ 97.2 million (33.84 million Euros and 53.34 million dollars) loan to finance Morocco's 10th Drinking Water Supply Project, bringing the Bank Group's overall commitment in the country to US$ 5.64 billion in 93 operations since the Bank started operations in the country in 1970. The project, approved by the Board of Directors on Wednesday in Tunis, builds on the success of Bank-financed projects and their significant contribution to the achievement of Morocco's drinking water supply and sanitation objectives


Senegalese Prime Minister Says Global Financial Crisis is Threat to Survival

Senegalese Prime Minister, Cheikh Hadjibou Soumaré, has said it is not an exaggeration to say that the world is fighting for its survival regarding the global financial crisis. Mr. Soumaré said this while opening deliberations of the 8th session of the Presidential Investment Council in Dakar, Senegal, on November 17, 2008.

He pointed out that the situation was a huge threat to African economies, adding, however, that it also offered many opportunities. He advised that the exigencies of the global context must serve as a guide and "should help us focus on priority actions and measures which could serve as a catalyst for the creation of a healthy and promising environment that is conducive to the creation of wealth and opportunities for prosperity.



The Struggle and Achievement of a Courageous Ethiopian Woman
STOLEN JUSTICE: One WomanÂ’s Struggle over Race-Bias, Corporate Greed and Legal Malpractice  
By Tseghe M. FooteStolen Justice, L. L. C.
Reviewed by Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia

Tseghe, of course, is a resilient woman and in spite of the early negative encounters in Denver, true to her childhood dream, she founded the Africa House, an African art boutique. Initially, however, housing African House was not easy and the owner could hardly find a lease contract and then she “never expected the ‘land of opportunity’ to have so many closed doors” (p. 32). Nevertheless, her mirage still lingered and thus her “faith of humanity felt renewed” when she found a space at Cherry Creek and she kept hope alive not knowing that her struggles against the Tivoli landlords would continue in a different form against the Tabor Center, a new site for Africa House. In fact, she soon got eviction notice from the Tabor Center and she had no choice but to hire a lawyer(s) and continue to fight. The newly hired lawyer reassured Tseghe that he will “file an injunction in federal court to block the eviction first in the morning.” (p. 73)


America!

Haileselassie Girmay  



The Testimony of History: First Black President of the United States

What President-Elect Barack Obama Must Do Now-  November 5, 2008

IDEA Editorial:                                                              

In infrastructure, America is the envy of the world. No nation has built superhighways, perennial roads, and magnificent bridges as the United States did. However, these infrastructures need immediate attention for repair, maintenance, and renovations. After all, American infrastructure is the tributary and lifeline of the economy. Renovating and restructuring the infrastructure is tantamount to revitalizing, cushioning, and boosting the national economy.


Prophesy or Political Expediency, Barack Obama May Become the First Black President of the United States

Ghelawdewos Araia October 16, 2008

Since the Voting Rights Act, slightly over four decades have elapsed and in due course the United States has made remarkable progress in race relations although vestiges of racism and racial prejudice are still well and alive. The psychology of racism is best exemplified by the recent incident in western Pennsylvania where some Whites explicitly and in no uncertain terms declared that they would not vote for Obama because he is Black. This might seem astounding but it is not altogether surprising given the deeply rooted racially divided United States society. For all intents and purposes, racism has subsided but it did not taper off completely and with the coming of Obama to power, America would undergo major restructuring in race relations and hopefully for the better.


Ethiopia: Draft Law Threatens Civil Society

Donor Governments Should Condemn Assault on Rights

New York – Ethiopia’s parliament should reject a draft law that would criminalize human rights activity and seriously undermine civil society groups, Human Rights Watch said today. Human Rights Watch called on donor governments to speak out publicly against the bill, which is expected to be introduced in parliament this month.

The Charities and Societies Proclamation (CSO law) would provide the government a potent tool to intimidate and weaken Ethiopia’s long beleaguered civil society. Although the bill has been revised twice since May 2008, the current version retains many of the most alarming provisions. “The only reason to have such a repressive law is if it would be used to strangle Ethiopia’s few remaining independent voices,” said Georgette Gagnon, Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “Donor governments should make clear to Ethiopia that enacting this law will threaten future funding.”


Civil Society Leaders Call for Mass Protests Against Mugabe
SW Radio Africa (London) 13 October 2008
By Lance GumaThe Secretary General of the Progressive Teachers Union of Zimbabwe (PTUZ) Raymond Majongwe, and Women of Zimbabwe Arise (WOZA) leader Jenni Williams, have both called for street protests against Mugabe's move to grab the key ministries. The state owned Herald on Saturday published a list of ministries allocated to ZANU PF and the MDC, by Mugabe using a government gazette. The ZANU PF leader grabbed Home Affairs, Defence, Justice, Information, Local Government and Foreign Affairs Ministries while giving the MDC minor ministries.


Kagame Launches One Laptop Per Child 
The New Times (Kigali) 2 October 2008
By James Karuhanga

President Paul Kagame has said that enabling all primary school children to own computers was the government's ultimate goal. This was during the official launch of the One Laptop per Child (OLPC) initiative at Jali Club yesterday. "Our goal is to continue finding means and ways to provide all primary school children in Rwanda with this important learning tool," Kagame said, adding that various schemes, including encouraging parents to participate in buying computers for their children, would be used.


Don't Rush Proposed Curriculum Reform   1 October 2008
New Vision (Kampala)-IT was good news yesterday that the education ministry suspended the implementation of a curriculum reform that would have drastically scaled down the number of subjects taught in secondary schools. 
The proposal in its current form has several negative consequences. For instance, thousands of teachers would be made redundant if the proposal is implemented the way it is. This would send a wrong signal and make it difficult to attract students to the teaching profession. 


When Criminals Control the Ministry of Education  September 10, 2008

George D. Gollin-The connection between education and personal economic advantage drives a global market for higher education. But much of the world cannot create additional university capacity at a rate to match this demand. Diploma mills, businesses that sell bogus degrees to customers in search of easy credentials, comprise the dark response to these market forces. The recent demise of a sophisticated American diploma mill provides some insight into these abominations.


Ethiopia celebrates restoration of giant obelisk

talian soldiers carted away the 24-meter (78-foot) third-century AD granite funeral stela in 1937 on the orders of then-dictator Benito Mussolini during his attempt to colonise Ethiopia.
Despite a 1947 agreement that called for its return, the obelisk had remained in Italy standing outside the Rome headquarters of the UN Food and Agriculture Organization, much to the anger of Ethiopia.
Its return was finally agreed upon in talks in Italy in November 2004 between Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi and Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, but its arrival was then announced and delayed several times.

Beijing 2008 Olympics: Symbol of the Emergence of China as a Global Power
Ghelawdewos Araia August 10, 2008

On August 8, 2008 when I watched the opening ceremony of Beijing 2008 Olympics, I was mesmerized and totally captivated by the 2008 drummers, not only by the sheer elegance and symmetry of their polymetric body movements, but also by their astounding dramatic reenactment of the glorious past of China. The talent of these seemingly robotic drummers altogether blends the bounties of nature and humanity and their gratifying posture, in a word, was protean, displaying great diversity in contradistinction to the uniformity of their roles. The incredible military-like pageantry of these drummers may not get a satisfying intellectual explanation if superficially observed but on close scrutiny the 4016 hands operated like two giant hands to signify unity, and most importantly the 4016 glowing drum sticks used by the drummers symbolize light of hope and bright future.


 



Unesco-Nigeria Project Reviews 57 Curricula

This Day (Lagos) NEWS
15 July 2008 Lagos
A total of 57 programmes in technical colleges and polytechnics have been reviewed under the first phase of the UNESCO-Nigeria project for the revitalization of Technical and Vocational Education (TVE), National Coordinator of the Project, Dr Nuru A. Yakubu has said.
Yakubu who is also the Executive Secretary of the National Board for Technical Education (NBTE), one of the unique features of the revised the curricula, which have been made available to stakeholders in hard and soft copies, was the incorporation of ICT and Entrepreneurship Education.



Global Political Theater and The Peripheral States of Africa
Ghelawdewos Araia

The degree of dependence, however, varies from country to country and across the board in Africa. A significant number of Africans in the early 1960s were vociferously and avowedly independent, and fiercely independent regimes like Sekou Toure of Guinea were penalized by economic embargo and diplomatic ostracism. At the other extreme of the continuum, there were some leaders who either wanted to postpone independence or simply continue the patronization of their ‘mother countryÂ’ France. 



ODE TO THE HUNGRY STOMACH 
June 10, 2008

Ghelawdewos Araia  

That Ethiopian belly once again starving

My people once again dying

The Ethiopian nation altogether crying

That Ethiopian mother for her children mourning


Out of Africa  Sunday May 18, 2008
Source: Observer, UK

For the moment, though, it is the music of the past that is attracting the attention of the West. Éthiopiques gathers an array of talents, among them singer Mahmoud Ahmed, who lifted a BBC World award last year, Alemayehu Eshete, saxophonist Getatchew Mekurya, and 'Ethio-jazz' bandleader Mulatu Astatke. It's these four who are heading for Europe, backed by the US jazz troupe Ether Orchestra.


Ethiopian Airlines says profits may hit record high
May 17, 2008,  REUTERS

ADDIS ABABA: Ethiopian Airlines net profits for the first nine months of 2007/08 reached 484 million birr ($55.67 million), the airline said in a statement. The state-owned carrier posted net profits of 129 million birr in 2006/07. The statement predicted that, based on the first nine months of 2007/08, the airline would achieve a record net profits and revenues. Expenses for the same period rose by 21 percent, the brunt of which Chief Executive Girma Wake said was spent on fuel. "Fuel price remains of concern to the industry as a whole and Ethiopian believes that costs will continue to escalate into the next quarter given the present trend in price of fuel," Wake said. Revenues for the period rose 29 percent to 6.6 million birr, he said. 
The airline transported 1.9 million passengers, a 19 percent increase on last year. Wake said the improvements in revenue and traffic were due to increased frequency of flights, the introduction of new routes and an increase in cargo revenue 


ZIMBABWE : From Party-Mobilizing to Monopolistic-Hegemonial Regime

Ghelawdewos Araia  May 6, 2008

We shall see what will happen in the run-off elections! It seems to me, however, that Mugabe could prevail only if he deploys all his secret, army, and police forces all over Zimbabwe. This last political ditch may not work for Mugabe this time for three reasons: 

1) Mugabe and his cronies are not as young and energetic as they were in the early 1980s; the wear and tear has taken a toll; 

2) the bulk of the Zimbabweans, who got the brunt of the crisis, are sick and tired of the monopolistic regime; 

3) Zimbabwe has now virtually became a desolate and isolated country in an increasingly globalized and interacting world, and the only hope for ZimbabweÂ’s resurrection is the MDC and other progressive Zimbabweans.



Ghelawdewos Araia

April 7, 2008 IDEA, Inc.

This essay will make a brief historical synopsis and analysis of the crimes perpetrated by the Italian fascists against the Ethiopian people in the 1930s. At this particular juncture, it may sound ironic to revisit the crimes against humanity committed in Ethiopia by Fascist henchmen like Marshall Pietro Badoglio and Marshal Rodolfo Graziani, but sometimes the past contends with the present especially if justice has not been served and no official apologies extended by state and/or religious leaders of the perpetrator nation. This essay is also aimed at reinforcing the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, a group of EthiopiansÂ’ initiative in an effort to convince the Vatican and Pope Benedict XVI to apologize to Ethiopians as he has done to the Jews in Germany with respect to the Holocaust committed by the Nazis. As a matter of fact, one of the members of the Global Alliance for Ethiopia, Ato Kidane Alemayehu has written a letter to the Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (Vatican_Apology_to_Ethiopia.doc) but to this day no answer was given.


The Kenya Political Crisis: Diagnosis and Prognosis
 
March 20, 2008  

Ghelawdewos Araia-Unless otherwise the Kenyan constitution is completely revised and re-written, the people of Kenya cannot simply accept a sudden departure from the politics that they are familiar with. According to the present Kenyan constitution, the President [Kibaki] is head of state and government and is elected directly by the people for a five-year term limited to two terms. The president selects members of the cabinet from the National Assembly and he also appoints the governors of the respective districts (69 autonomous provincial districts) and members of the judiciary including the Chief Justice and High Court judges.


March 18, 2008 Transcript

Barack ObamaÂ’s Speech on Race

Throughout the first year of this campaign, against all predictions to the contrary, we saw how hungry the American people were for this message of unity. Despite the temptation to view my candidacy through a purely racial lens, we won commanding victories in states with some of the whitest populations in the country. In South Carolina, where the Confederate Flag still flies, we built a powerful coalition of African Americans and white Americans. This is not to say that race has not been an issue in the campaign. At various stages in the campaign, some commentators have deemed me either “too black” or “not black enough.” We saw racial tensions bubble to the surface during the week before the South Carolina primary. The press has scoured every exit poll for the latest evidence of racial polarization, not just in terms of white and black, but black and brown as well.


If Barack Obama Becomes the Next President of the United States! A Comparative and International Politics Perspective.  March 2, 2008

Ghelawdewos Araia- If Barack Obama becomes the next president, can America adapt to the global changing circumstances? Given America’s political history of ‘constancy and change,’ and the ability of the nation to reinvent itself, the United States will definitely attempt to accommodate the new order rather than clash with it. The new world order that I have alluded to above is not just a multi-polar world tainted with balance of powers but it is also going to herald peaceful coexistence and cooperation among the peoples of our planet earth. In order to foster such a grandiose plan of international cooperation and cultural exchange, an Obama type of leader is the necessary prerequisite, because he has already united the American people and will bridge U. S. interests with other global interests and he is of dual heritage, American and African who can smoothly connect not just Kenya but also the entire continent of Africa with America. America needs a Barack Obama leadership in the first decade to quarter of the 21st century, but we will have to wait and see for its fruition.


THE ETHIOPIAN VICTORY AT ADWA: MEANINGS FOR AFRICANS AND PEOPLE OF AFRICAN DESCENT IN THE DIASPORA 

Dr. GHELAWDEWOS ARAIA- March 2, 2008 - More than any moment in their history, Ethiopians must jealously guard a united and strong Ethiopia in an effort to continue the legacy of their patriotic forefathers and guarantee the national interest and security of their nation. They should never succumb to ethnic-specific issues despite the current ethnocentric politics hovering over Ethiopian communities at home and elsewhere. Unity and brotherhood among various Ethiopian nationality groups is extremely crucial, and Adwa is a constant reminder of a unified force that can virtually circumvent a negative political monster that is aimed at dismantling the organic and cohesive fabric of a given historic entity. Ethiopians have witnessed peaceful coexistence amongst themselves for millennia and they have no wish other than harmony and fraternity toward one another and toward others. It is in light of the above reality, therefore, that we must now celebrate the 110th anniversary of the victory of Adwa, and so that our subscribers appreciate in some depth and get the flavor of what Adwa was all about, we have hereby post two articles on the victory of Adwa written and presented by Dr.Ghelawdewos Araia; one in English, presented at Howard University (Washington, DC) and the Dusable Museum (Chicago) for the centennial celebration in 1996; the second, in Amharic, presented before an Ethiopian audience in Seattle for the 107th anniversary of Adwa in 2003.


IDEA Editorial

March 2, 2008

111th Anniversary of the Victory of Adwa

Is the 111th anniversary of the victory of Adwa. This IDEA editorial, however, is not intended to present an elaborate version of the history of Adwa victory. It is rather a critique of the misguided perceptions and misconceptions with respect to Adwa. Some Ethiopians think that the victory of Adwa was the victory of the people of Adwa. This category of people is either misled by some mysterious and unfathomable dictates or is simply ignorant of the historical circumstances that led to the battle of Adwa.


Uganda: Makerere University Ranking Up
MAKERERE University has significantly moved up the rankings of the top 100 universities in Africa.

According to the latest rankings of world universities updated in January 2008, the 86-year old university is now placed at number 47th, seven steps up from where it was last year. Makerere is also the only Ugandan university that features on the list. The Uganda Christian University that was 97th in 2007 is off the current ratings. The highest ranked University in East Africa is Strathmore University Nairobi at number 21. Others are University of Dar es Salaam (22), University of Nairobi (25), Egerton University (33) and National University of Rwanda (44).


Literacy Plan to Provide 300 000 Adult Classes

BuaNews (Tshwane)

A mass literacy campaign, the Kha Ri Gude project, is to provide basic literacy classes to 300 000 adults and youth. This emerged from President Thabo Mbeki's State of the Nation Address Friday, which focuses on a Business Unusual approach, delivered at the opening of Parliament in Cape Town on Friday.

As part of the Adult Basic Education and Training programme (ABET), the President said: "We shall this month launch the Kha Ri Gude mass literacy campaign. "This will include the training of master trainers who will provide basic literacy classes to 300 000 adults and youth in 2008."


Seeye Abraha:  The Transformative Personality in Ethiopian Politics     January 23, 2008

By Bereket Kiros-Seeye Abraha captured in his energetic articulation of the inner reality of the diverse political views (lives) of the many feuding Ethiopians and their organizations. Chinua Achebe in his novel “A Man of the People” narrates about two contrasting groups of people in West Africa. In that novel, he describes two characters representing the old and the new generations of politicians. The conflict between the old and the new political systems is portrayed through the two characters as they disagree and quarrel over political views. Seeye likewise captured in his articulation the essence of the present conflict between Ethiopian politicians, the new against the old, the leftist against the rightist, the Derg against the democratic et cetera that paralleled the main theme of Achebe's novel. 


A New Paradigm in Ethiopian Politics: A discussion on what Ethiopians can do at this historical juncture to bring about change in Ethiopia
Ghelawdewos Araia   
January 14 2008-How can this paradigm of epistemology be attained though? The advanced segment of Ethiopian learned men and women (intellectuals and professionals) could make enormous contribution if they are willing to do so and if conditions in Ethiopia are favorable and permissive. These educators must be open and receptive as well as focused and hard driven, and they canÂ’t afford to exhibit non-committal silence in the middle of their endeavor.



Dr. Ghelawdewos Araia to speak on 'African Commonality with particular focus on the Ethiopian-Eritrean relations'



IDEA Editorial

January 4, 2008

The Obama Factor and American Electoral Politics

Obama, therefore, may continue to be a charismatic persona representing hope and change, but in the end it is the Electoral College, and not the popular vote, that would decide the selection of the would president of the United States of America. To begin with, the Democratic Party, ObamaÂ’s own party, out of fear losing to the Republican Party, may not chose Obama as its candidate in its forthcoming convention.



Universities Create Partnership to Improve Disaster Risk Management

The Reporter (Addis Ababa) By Yelibenwork Ayele

The three-year 200,000 USD grant will help Bahir Dar University create a regional institute of excellence on disaster risk management and sustainable development with support from the University of Arizona (UA). The new project is being implemented in partnership with the Higher Education for Development.

 

Halfway to 2015 Education Goals, Progress Not Fast Enough 
UN Integrated Regional Information Networks
Posted to the web 17 December 2007 Dakar 

Critics say donors at a recent high-level meeting failed to make firm funding commitments for improving education, particularly in impoverished, fragile and war-torn countries, making it highly unlikely the world will meet ambitious education goals by the 2015 deadline. "I cannot be very optimistic," Koïchiro Matsuura, director-general of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), said at a press conference on 13 December in the Senegalese capital, Dakar, at the close of the three-day meeting of the High-Level Group on Education for All, which brought together education ministers, donors and development partners.


 



Towards Confederation in the Horn of Africa Focus on Ethiopia and Eritrea

This is a new addition to the volumes of works on the Horn of Africa. From the back page of the Book: In this book Professor Tesfatsion Medhanie explores the possibility of confederal relations between Ethiopia and Eritrea. Such an arrangement could become the nucleus of a Horn of Africa confederation. The author discusses the obstacles at present and the necessary conditions for success in this regard.


SOVEREIGNTY: An Absolute and Perpetual Power A Discussion on U. S. – Ethiopia Relations

Ghelawdewos Araia  October 26, 2007

If we follow Diamond’s extrapolations, therefore, HR 2003 will only serve as an extension of the old-fashioned ‘carrot and stick’ policy and will not realize Congress’ intention of scrutinizing the Ethiopian government on “human rights violations”, but by default could penalize and harm Ethiopia. It is simple logic: In the absence of the vital institutions for the establishment of democracy, we cannot have viable democratic governance in Ethiopia or elsewhere in the Third World.


Uganda: Makerere University Diverts Internet Money October 22, 2007

MAKERERE University has directed the sh600m meant to pay for Internet services to fixing its roads. The university secretary, Sam Akorimo, attributed the shift to the Government's failure to include the university in its budget for road repairs ahead of the Commonwealth meeting (CHOGM) next month.


Nigeria: Country to Participate in Olympead Math Competition

Nigeria is to participate in the next international mathematics and science Olympiad competition, the director general, National Mathematical Centre Abuja, has said. The center at the weekend held preparatory exams in all the states of the federation and FCT which will be followed by the geo-political and the national one in order to chose those that will represent the country at the international event.October 22, 2007


Eritrea's Economic Survival

Conference Report
Sally Healy, September 2007


Points of Clarification for the Sake of Educational Discourse   October 3, 2007

Ghelawdewos Araia-Instead of burying oneself in the sand – the ostrich syndrome – the best critique of my article would have been a thoughtful analysis that is credible, plausible, and enumerates in plain but coherent English what Ethiopians can do for their country. Moreover, a critic’s responsibility is to critically examine concepts, themes, and controversies that are part of the corpus of a given essay without resorting to polemics and sarcastically appealing to the powers that be for attention and personal gains. However, as I have stated in the introduction of this essay, we must tolerate a broader continuum of perspectives including the sublime and the absurd. Our destiny has been to traverse a complex path tainted with positive and negative attributes, in order to achieve a relatively sane and democratic society.


Seeking Peace in the Horn of Africa Solutions for Somalia

Duke University Talent Identification Program's International Affairs Institute. September 26, 2007


Beyond the Millennium, Beyond Illusion and Cynicism, and the Challenges of Development . Ghelawdewos Araia    September 20, 2007
“In the last fifteen years, I have argued all along that the EPRDF government needs to attract Ethiopian intellectuals and professionals and utilize their expertise and talent. So far, I have not witnessed the use of Ethiopian professionals en masse for nation building, notwithstanding the few and far in between favored officials that hold ministerial positions and other portfolios. If the Meles regime is indeed in favor of ‘educated and healthy workforce, world-class managers and professionals,’ it should openly extend its hands to all Ethiopians, especially those who are scattered all over the Diaspora. Irrespective of our differences and political inclinations, I personally like the government of Ethiopia to reach out fellow Ethiopians who are willing to contribute to the transformation of their country and the welfare of their people.


Ethiopian Art: Identification and Dating of Crosses and Alleged Brancale on Works. All Africa.com

The unique character of Ethiopian art is the legacy of its situation high in the mountains on the Horn of Africa. Though remote and often isolated it evolved a tradition, going back to the fourth century AD, in response to contacts with Byzantine, European and Islamic cultures. Beginning in the twelfth century, elaborate crosses were cast and engraved in iron and bronze. Painted and carved icons were produced in a tradition that reached its peak at the end of the seventeenth century. Above all it is richly illustrated manuscripts that have provided the most defining expression of Ethiopian Christianity.


Darfur Should Exemplify the End of all Violence in Africa

IDEA Editorial     

August 6, 2007

Now, we have high hope that the 26,000 UN troops will effectively monitor the activities of the Janjaweed and the mood and unpredictable behavior of the Beshir regime. First thing is first: the UN peacekeeping forces must end all violence in Darfur by fully involving the spokesmen and representatives of the people of Darfur in their own affair. Whatever actions and resolutions are taken without the involvement of the people of Darfur would become meaningless and ineffective. Beyond the people of Darfur, the involvement of other Africans via the African Union (AU) is also crucially important.


IDEA Editorial  

July 22, 2007

Good News From Ethiopia in Anticipation of the Millennium Celebration

What is important, now, however, is the pardoning and freedom of the 38 CUD leaders. It is a delight to witness their reunion with their respective families, as Siye Abraha did with his family and his ailing mother. We also wish the Kinijit leaders a happy and prosperous life as well as  reintegration in Ethiopian politics, and if they pursue the latter they must seriously consider the subtle nuances of Third World politics; they must transcend cultural and linguistic (ethnic politics) affinities; they should not be limited to and motivated by political considerations (the power nexus) but should also consider the exigencies of economic development or transformative politics;


Dear Ghelawdewos (Dr.),
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Uganda: More Oil, Gas Found

Edris Kisambira- Resource-rich African countries and those with big economies like Nigeria, South Africa, Kenya, Angola, DRC, Egypt, Libya, should really be judged by the MDGs because they and should do much better than that. Even the poorer countries like Ethiopia can do better if they set their priority right. If Ethiopia has resources to occupy another country it can certainly do better at home.


 Southern Africa:SADC to Set Up Gas, Petroleum Body
Wilfred Edwin- The secretariat said the consultant will be tasked to identify petroleum and gas issues that need harmonization and draft appropriate specifications, rules, and standards. The consultant will identify functions, tasks and structure of the regional petroleum and gas sector association and advise on the feasibility of having a composite regional energy regulator encompassing electricity, petroleum and gas. The East African region is said to have a high oil and gas potential. This has seen players in the industry call for joint petroleum exploration ventures. The secretariat of the East African Community hosted the third East African Petroleum Conference in Arusha, this March at which sector development in the sub-region was discussed.


Continent Leaders, Rich Nations Hold Key to Africa's Success   July 12,  2007

By Dr. Tajudeen Kampala- There are countries that are doing quite well on a number of the goals even if they may not meet all of them. Across the continent in education, most of the countries have seen huge rises in enrolment in primary schools as a result of debt relief and new prioritization of the education of our children by many governments. Uganda, for instance, has raised the gear from universal primary education to the secondary level; Kenya is considering the same. Malawi has proven that where there is a will there is a way and even Africa's sleeping giant, Nigeria has reintroduced compulsory universal basic education.


Africa must unite with a big-bang even if the heavens fall: A Call to the Summit in ACCRA!! June 30, 2007 By NES Commentary

On the eve of this historic African Heads of States meeting with a possible impending decision expected on  how  and when to implement the one and only one item on the agenda: the African Union Government: towards the United states of Africa, NES joins all the inspiring pan-Africanists such as Kwame Nkrumah, George Padmore and others to urge Africans to make a big- bang burst into world history by doing Pan-Africanism in practice and making it work by deploying knowledge rather than to use as usual hundred good  or not so good reasons why Africans should continue to talk unity while keeping  separate and apart from each other.


IDEA Editorial  June 25, 2007

Granting Freedom to Political Prisoners is a Step in the Right Direction  6/23/2007
We at IDEA do not pretend to act as strategic peace brokers between the Ethiopian Government and the opposition, but we wish peace and development (two faces of the same coin) to prosper in Ethiopia. The Government and the Opposition, therefore,  must find ways and means to negotiate their interests and differences via dialogue and civil discourse without resorting to antagonism and coercion. Both groups